1304.21(a)                    Child development and education approach for all children.

1304.21(a)(1)                In order to help children gain the social competence, skills and confidence necessary to be prepared to succeed in their present environment and with later responsibilities in school and life, grantee and delegate agencies’ approach to child development and education must:

1304.21(a)(1)(i)             Be developmentally and linguistically appropriate, recognizing that children have individual rates of development as well as individual interests, temperaments, languages, cultural backgrounds, and learning styles;

 

Bilingual/multicultural experiences are given special emphasis in the HEAD START of Greater Dallas, Inc. (HSGD or Head Start) program.  The purpose of these experiences is to focus more intensively on the individual cultural needs and preferences of the children.  Multicultural education also includes experiences about people’s history, current customs and more.

 

Cultural activities are integrated into the classroom to give each child an opportunity to have various experiences in his/her culture.  Culturally relevant and diverse programming examines and challenges institutional and personal biases.  The multicultural population includes African Americans, Euro Americans, Mexican Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans and other nationalities that vary from year to year.  Head Start of Greater Dallas has served up to ninety eight different languages in one program year.  A resource person from each culture is invited into the center to share experiences and activities in the individual’s heritage, which may include songs, food preparation, dances and native dress.

 

Every attempt is made to hire at least one person in the center that speaks the child’s language.  In the event that only a few children speak a language different from the majority, every attempt is made to insure there will be an adult available within a center or the community to communicate in the native language.  HEAD START of Greater Dallas ensures that no child will be denied the opportunity to communicate because of a language barrier.  Teachers ask parents to supply them with low level words to allow them to communicate with children in the first few weeks in the classroom; words such as bathroom, listen, eat etc. this will help dual language learners feel more connected to their environment.

 

Classrooms are structured to address the whole child.  The physical environment is arranged in such a manner that children have opportunities to use manipulative toys, storybooks, dramatic play material (foods, utensils, clothing), and posters to ensure that children are aware of ethnic diversity in their communities.  Children are encouraged to accept and respect the differences of various cultures.  Multicultural resource books are in each classroom.  Food items from different ethnic populations are brought in, discussed and prepared by teachers, parents and children.  Parents and volunteers of different ethnic groups represented in the community are involved with the centers.  Children are taken on field trips to businesses in the community and language is spoken and written in cultures represented.  All activities, materials and equipment are based on the child’s

developmental needs as determined by the portfolio assessments as well as input from parents.  Equipment and materials are nonsexist and non-stereotyping.  Classrooms are labeled in the languages represented in the classroom.  Staff and/or volunteers are available to interact with children in each child’s primary language when possible.


 

 

HS ACT 641A (a)     Ensure programs have adequate numbers of qualified staff; and that the

(1) (B) (ii) (V)             teachers and staff receive adequate training to meet the education

                                 Performance Standards through activities that “promote children’s

                                 Language and literacy growth through techniques identified in scientifically

                                Based reading research to promote the acquisition of the English language

                                 for non-English background children and families.

                       

                                 The academic goal of Head Start of Greater Dallas is to ensure that every child

                                 who attends Head Start of Greater Dallas enters into kindergarten with                                                                        the strong basic foundational skills in language and literacy needed to succeed in

                                 K-12 core academic content areas in English.  Head Start of Greater Dallas also

                                 recognizes parents are the first and most important teachers of their children

                                 and the vital role teachers play in preparing children for lifetime learning,

                                 especially language development and cognitive growth.

 

                        The Head Start of Greater Dallas’ policy for Dual Language Learners is to:

                                                 

                                    1.  Honor Home Language by providing signs, labels, notices, notes, letters home

                                          in Home Language.

 

                                    2.  Respect Home Language by allowing the use of Home Language in the

                                         Classroom, illustrating or demonstrating key concepts in Home Language.

 

                                    3.  Nurture Home Language by using bilingual aides, parent volunteers, and

                                         Instructional materials in Home Language.

 

                                    4.  Support Home Language by integrating Home Language and Culture in

                                         Classroom: use of books and songs, parent speakers, and celebrations.

 

                                    5.  Support language acquisition and development in English and the

                                         home language for all Dual Language Learners by:

 

·        Modifying instruction to address various levels of language proficiency.

·        Facilitating Home Language Instruction at Home.

·        Focusing on Oral Language Development: Phonic and Phonemic Awareness in the classroom and at home

                                   

                                    6.  Provide equal access to Dual Language Learners to the opportunity to learn...

·        Integrating language acquisition and language development into core instruction.

·        Continuous modification of instruction and checking for comprehension.

·        Explicitly teaching language, math and science content.

·        Continuously measuring performance to ensure mastery of readiness skills.

 

                                    This year will be the first phase of implementation of Head Start of Greater

                                    Dallas’ Dual Language Policy.  The first phase of implementation is the

                                    integration of dual language strategies into the current curriculum; such as

                                    letting children practice oral language skills in class with peers, adults, and

                                    teachers, use activities that highlight the meanings, uses and production of

                                    print found in classroom signs, labels, notes, posters, calendars and directions;

                                    use “word play” activities in which children change beginning, middle or ending

                                    letters of related words, and hence change the words they decode and spell.

                                    The teachers hold primary responsibility for instruction in English and supporting                                            home language development. 

                       

                                    The second phase addresses the parents as teachers of the children and parent

                                    training.  The parents hold primary responsibility for instruction in home

                                    language and supporting English language development.

                                                                                       

1304.21(a)                    Child development and education approach for all children. (Continued)

1304.21(a)(1)                In order to help children gain the social competence, skills and confidence necessary to be prepared to succeed in their present environment and with later responsibilities in school and life, grantee and delegate agencies’ approach to child development and education must: (Continued)

1304.21(a) (1) (ii)          Be inclusive of children with disabilities, consistent with their Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) or Individualized Education Program (IEP) (see 45 CFR 1308.19);

 

Additional or modified materials and activities are provided for children with special needs as recommended in the IEP (Individual Education Plan) and IFSP (Individual Family Service Plan).  Each content area’s staff members are aware of their responsibility to assist the team with the child’s needs.  Each content area works with individual needs and serves as a resource in integrating content area into the daily classroom program.  The Head Start Family Information System (HSFIS) is used to store information, track referrals and update the IEP for the child with special needs.

 

1304.21(a) (1) (iii)         Provide an environment of acceptance that supports and respects gender, culture,

language, ethnicity and family composition;

 

1304.21(a) (1) (iv)         Provide a balanced daily program of child-initiated and adult-directed activities,

including individual and small group activities; and

 

The daily schedule provides a balance of active and quiet play, individual and small group activities, large and small muscle activities, and child-initiated and teacher-initiated activities.  There is a balance of teacher and child initiated activities.  Children not wanting to participate are given other options.

 

1304.21(a) (1) (v)          Allow and enable children to independently use toilet facilities when it is

developmentally appropriate and when efforts to encourage toilet training are supported by the parents.

 

Toileting facilities are provided such that children are able to use them independently.  Toilet training is encouraged when staff and parents have agreed that the child is ready, has control of bodily functions and has the verbal skills to communicate the need to use the facility.  There is a cooperative effort between parent and teacher to support the child’s efforts.  Staff is always present when children are toileting. Children have the opportunity to use the toileting facilities anytime during the course of the day with the supervision of the teacher.  Toileting is not used as a group activity and does not appear on the daily schedule, it is an individualized function of each child.  During preparation for lunch and naptime children are involved in activities (such as book reading, journaling, finger plays etc.) as they proceed to toilet and wash hands before lunch.  As the children finish lunch they began the toileting process while some children are still eating, helping clean tables, or on their cots.

 

 

 

1304.21(a)                    Child development and education approach for all children. (Continued)

 

1304.21(a) (2)               Parents must be:

 

1304.21(a) (2) (i)           Invited to become integrally involved in the development of the programs

Curriculum and approach to child development and education;

 

Parents are encouraged to be an active part of their child’s education.  The parents are asked to complete the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment (DECA) upon entry into the center.  This instrument helps the staff understand how the parents view the child’s social emotional health.  After the child has been in the classroom for four weeks the teacher completes the same assessment on the child.  The two assessments are then scored; the teacher, education and special service staff will have a snap shot of the child’s needs.  The Devereux is also used for the first time this school year with our Dallas and Lancaster ISD partners.  Parents in the Head Start of Greater Dallas program are provided a comment sheet in their child’s portfolio to give teachers input and information about the child at home. 

 

Parents are provided weekly “Take Home Activities” that are an extension of the weekly Scholastic Big Day for Pre-K.  Parents are asked to document time spent with their child actively involved.  Parents are encouraged to spend no more than fifteen to twenty minute intervals per activity and returning to the same activity later.  Repetition is recommended for young children as they learn new concepts.  During the fall and spring Home Visits teachers follow up on the progress of the “Take Home Activities.  Parents share how they used the activities and give the teacher some ideas on how they made the activity successful for their child; the teacher can use this information for classroom planning.

 

There are two Home Visits and two Parent Conferences per year.  Our ISD partners follow a similar time line for home visits and parent conferences.  The ISD teachers are sometimes accompanied on home visits by the Family Advocate or Education Coordinator assigned to their school.  At the home visits, the parent and teacher discuss education goals for the child as well as plan activities that the parents can do with the child to support what the teacher is doing in the classroom.  Take Home activities. Take Home activities from the Scholastic curriculum are also discussed.  The parent conferences allow for follow-up of the planned goals and activities and an opportunity to discuss the results of the Learning Accomplishment Profile Revised 3rd Edition (LAP-3) an on-going assessment.  They also provide another opportunity for parents and teachers to share information about the child.  Parents have additional opportunities for involvement through service on the Education Advisory Committee, Annual Parent Events (that include all the Content Areas), volunteering in the classroom, attending staff training’s and receiving take-home activities to extend the child’s learning opportunities. 

 

In addition, parents are encouraged to use the Parent and Community Suggestions for Curriculum Development. This form is located in the Parent Education Handbook; it ask parents for feedback on curriculum changes, input on the classroom lesson plans, circle time activities, daily scheduling and other ideas parents may have and want to share with the education content area.

 

The Vogel Alcove staff conducts Home Visits the same place services are provided to the children because the families reside in a shelter and visitors are not allowed on the shelter grounds and parents must abide by the regulations.  A letter is placed in each family’s file discussing why this process is done.  During the home visit process parents are given the opportunity to discuss their child’s progress and areas the parent and teacher can work on together to help the child. All home visits and parent conferences are documented in the agency’s database as well as Vogel’s database.

 

1304.21(a) (2) (ii)          Provided opportunities to increase their child observation skills and to share

Assessments with staff that will help plan the learning experiences; and

 

During the first home visit teachers share the results of the screening for new children and the pre-assessment results for returning children.  During this time teachers and parents discuss skills emerging, mastered and areas that need improving. Parent “Take Home Activities” are also discussed and the teacher share with the parent strategies on how to make the “take home activities” a success.  Teachers follow up on Parent Take Home Activities during the fall and spring Home Visits.  The Parent Take Home Activities are activities taken from the Scholastic Big Day for Pre-K and are specifically designed for parents to use at home with their children.  Parents are also able to log on to the Scholastic web site to get take home activities to use at home with their children.  Parent and teacher agree on activities that can be used at home and school to increase the child’s skills and knowledge.  During the fall parent conference teachers follow up with parents on the activities that were planned during the home visit to see if the child has mastered additional skills.  Assessment information is continually discussed since the assessment is on-going and goals change as children master new skills.   During the (2012-2013) school year with the implementation of  Phase III of the Dual Language Policy parents will have a greater opportunity to participate in their non-English speaking child’s education; parents will have the primary responsibility for instruction in their home language at home while supporting English language development at school.

 

1304.21(a) (2) (iii)         Encouraged to participate in staff-parent conferences and home visits to discuss

their child’s development and education (see 45 CFR 1304.40(e) (4) and 45 CFR 1304.40(i) (2)).

 

HS ACT642 (6) (A)       At the option of such agency, offer (directly or through referral to local entities)

                                    to such parents- -

                                    training in basic child development (including cognitive, social, and emotional

                                    development;

                       

Parents are provided several formal and informal opportunities to increase their child observation skills.  Parents are invited to participate in the pre-service and in-service conferences held by the agency.  There is a Parent Education Training that is held in conjunction with other content areas.  Parent meetings each month also provide an opportunity for training.  Education Specialists provide monthly training’s for teachers that parents are invited to attend as well as workshops that are planned specifically for parents in other content areas such as nutrition and health information.  In addition to the formal opportunities, parents are always invited to observe in their child’s classroom.  Parents are given copies of the Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP-3) on-going assessment “Parent Report” that explains child’s on-going developmental progress. Parents are given “Parent Take Home Activities” that are directly connected to the curriculum that serves as a learning tool for both parents and children.  Teachers follow up on the entire “Take Home Activities” during the home visits at that time teachers can help parents understand their child’s cognitive, social and emotional development.

 

 

1304.21(a)                    Child development and education approach for all children. (Continued)

 

1304.21(a) (3)               Grantee and delegate agencies must support social and emotional development

by:

 

1304.21(a) (3) (i)           Encouraging development which enhances each child’s strengths by:

 

1304.21(a) (3) (i) (A)     Building trust;

           

Children have the opportunity to develop strong attachments and trusting relationships with other children and teachers by remaining with the same teacher (Continuity of Care) as they progress through the Head Start program.  Teachers are available and responsive to the children and interact frequently at the children’s level.  Teachers use the children’s given name (no nicknames) when talking and interacting with the children throughout the day.  Daily routines and consistent discipline and guidance procedures are followed to enhance the development of trust.

 

1304.21(a) (3) (i) (B)     Fostering independence;

 

Independence is encouraged, as children are developmentally ready.  Many opportunities are given during the day for children to use their independent skills, such as setting the table, family style serving of meals at breakfast, lunch and snack, independent toileting, having water available for independent use, children choosing their own activities and cleaning up after themselves.

 

1304.21(a) (3) (i) (C)     Encouraging self-control by setting clear, consistent limits, and having realistic

expectations;

 

1304.21(a) (3) (i) (D)     Encouraging respect for the feelings and rights of others; and

 

Teachers are encouraging self-control by planning with the children, by having the classroom rules with the appropriate consequences.  Teachers support appropriate behaviors while assisting children with their problem solving skills for inappropriate behaviors.  Teachers are taught to assist and encourage children to respect each other and use problem solving and compromise in settling disputes.  The Second Step “A Violence Prevention Curriculum” is used in all of the Head Start classrooms.  The Second Step curriculum assist children in labeling and controlling feelings, understanding ways to calm down and manage strong feelings and to deal with disappointment appropriately.

 

 

 

1304.21(a)                    Child development and education approach for all children. (Continued)

1304.21(a) (3)               Grantee and delegate agencies must support social and emotional development

by: (Continued)

1304.21(a) (3) (i)           Encouraging development which enhances each child’s strengths by: (Continued)

1304.21(a) (3) (i) (E)     Supporting and respecting the home language, culture, and family composition of

each child in ways that support the child’s health and well-being; and

 

HS ACT 642(10)           Develop procedures for identifying children who are limited English proficient,

                                    And informing the parents of such children about the instruction services use to

                                    help children make progress towards acquiring the knowledge and skills

                                    described in section 641A (a) (1) (B) and acquisition of the English Language.

Children are identified with limited English proficiency through developmental screening.  The screenings are administered in English and Spanish when possible.  For children that speak other languages a parent, teachers or translator is used for the screening. Children are also identified as non English speaking through information obtained from parents upon enrollment.  Head Start of Greater Dallas is in the planning stages of implementing a screening tool that will determine a dual language learner’s level of skill in their home language and in English.  The Pre-IPT English/Spanish 4th edition developed by Ballard & Tighe.  This instrument will be piloted in five of our centers that have 40% or more non-English speaking children in the fall of 2012. 

 

After the child has been identified as having limited English proficiency ever effort is made to support the parent in help them understand the importance of maintaining the child’s home language while acquiring English.

 

Teachers support the home language and culture of the child by providing multicultural resources in the classroom.  Labels are in the languages represented in the room.  A staff person or volunteer are available to interact with the child in the home language.  Multicultural materials (such as dolls, books [including books in the home language], dramatic play materials [foods, utensils, clothing, etc.], posters, pictures of the children and /or their families, music and musical instruments, puzzles, foods and cooking experiences) are available throughout the rooms.  The Scholastic Big Day for Pre-K (the cornerstone to our curriculum) addresses sensitivity to various cultures.  Parents are given “Take Home Activities” in their home language as well as in English.  Opportunities to discuss the activities are available during home visits or at any time the parent as a need for assistance.  The “Take Home Activities are an extension of the weekly themes.  Parents are encouraged to use the Home Language when they are sharing Take Home Activities with their child.  

 

 

 

1304.21(a) (3) (ii)          Planning for routines and transitions so that they occur in a timely, predictable

and unrushed manner according to each child’s needs.

 

Teachers plan for smooth transitions by informing children ahead of time, not always expecting children to move as a group, having the next activity prepared ahead, and using songs and finger plays during the transition.  When possible teachers prepare for the next day’s activities before they leave the center each evening.  Materials and activity cards are out and ready for use when the children arrive.

 

1304.21(a) (4)               Grantee and delegate agencies must provide for the development of each child’s

cognitive and language skill by:

1304.21(a) (4) (i)           Supporting each child’s learning, using various strategies including

experimentation, inquiry, observation, play and exploration;

 

Cognitive activities such as: solving problems, asking questions - progressing from the simple to the complex, are available so that children can begin at their current skill level and progress at their own pace. Pre-math activities such as:  labeling, classifying, sorting, patterning, one-to-one correspondence, counting and measuring, are available for cognitive growth and language development.  Hands-on science activities such as:  growing seeds, studying the life cycles of living things, and pets, is integrated into the monthly themes to promote observation, exploration, inquiry and drawing conclusions.  As children gain proficiency with one skill, teachers will help them move on to the next level.

 

The agency is in the process of researching a math and science enriched curriculum that is being piloted in sixty-eight classrooms we are going into our fifth year.  There is a treatment group as well as a control group.  In the treatment group teachers are provided materials, training and mentoring to incorporate hands-on-math and science activities in the classrooms.

 

Children evidenced significant gains in math and science skills.  New enthusiasm for science activities was demonstrated by both teachers and children.  There was a significant increase in children’s science scores over time.

 

1304.21(a)                    Child development and education approach for all children. (Continued)

 

1304.21(a) (4)               Grantee and delegate agencies must provide for the development of each child’s

cognitive and language skill by: (Continued)

 

1304.21(a) (4) (ii)          Ensuring opportunities for creative self-expression through activities such as art,

music, movement, and dialogue;

 

Opportunities for creative expression are provided through child-directed activities, such as painting, coloring, collage and play dough.  The emphasis for the art activities are placed on the process and not the product.  There is adequate space and materials to provide for creative dramatics, dancing and creative movement activities.  A variety of music and musical instruments are available for children to use freely.

 

 

1304.21(a) (4) (iii)         Promoting interaction and language use among children and between children

and adults; and

 

The development of language is supported by the use of open-ended questions  throughout the day, reading to children, having children “read” to each other, using poems, songs, finger plays, nursery rhymes and riddles, having children talk about their pictures and experiences and having teachers write down what the children say, allowing time for conversation between the children as well as with the teacher, providing a print-rich environment, a computer center where children learn language concepts through stories and games, flannel boards activities, rebus stories and puppets.  Books are part of the entire classroom not just limited to the library.  Books are included in each learning center that relate to the theme of the week or special activity in a particular center.

 

Formal writing centers are available in each classroom with words, letters of the alphabet, children’s names and environmental print displayed for children to use.  Writing materials are available in other centers, such as dramatic play for taking orders in restaurants and/or writing letters to parents, or in the block area for making signs to label the children’s construction.  Open-ended opportunities are also provided for children to develop their writing skills.  Writing materials are encouraged throughout the classroom.  In addition the Scholastic Early Childhood Program is enriched with activities to address children’s language and literacy needs.

 

1304.21(a)                    Child development and education approach for all children. (Continued)

 

1304.21(a) (5)               In center-based settings, grantee and delegate agencies must promote each child’s physical development by:

 

1304.21(a) (5) (i)           Providing sufficient time, indoor and outdoor space, equipment, materials and

adult guidance for active play and movement that support the development of gross motor skills;

 

A variety of gross motor activities include many opportunities for children to develop competence and confidence in their skills.  As part of the daily routine, opportunities are available for children to carry objects, take nature walks, exercise and move to music, engage in role-playing actions and short dramas.  A variety of equipment includes cup stilts, small beanbags for tossing, puppet shows, ring toss, a parachute, floor puzzles, hollow blocks, large Legos, and strollers for dramatic play.  Large floor areas (carpet and not) are provided for movement and other activities such as throwing and jumping.  Outside equipment is provided for large motor development, such as small nets and beach balls, trikes or scooters.  Teachers plan for outdoor activities that include parachute games, hoop activities, ball games, an obstacle course, group games, climbing equipment with a balance beam, ladders, poles and tires.

 

As part of the agency’s effort to address childhood obesity three Head Start Centers are piloting the “I Am Moving, I Am Learning Curriculum.  This curriculum was developed through the University of West Virginia and is being used in Head Start centers throughout the country.  HEAD START of Greater Dallas is using the program at Sunnyview, Lancaster-Kiest, and Lake June where a high rate of childhood obesity has been identified.  This program will improve the quality of physical activity and increase the quantity of the time spent in Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity for children in our program.  The agency’s goal is to implement this program in all its classrooms in conjunction with Health and Nutrition content areas.  The art of Yoga activities have been introduced to children in several of our centers.  This is not only a physical activity it also relieves stress which affects a child’s behavior.

 

1304.21(a) (5) (ii)          Providing appropriate time, space, equipment, materials and adult guidance

for the development of fine motor skills according to each child’s developmental level; and

 

Experimentation with a wide range of physical skills occurs through large and small muscle activities.  Teachers promote the child’s physical development by providing time in the daily schedule for active outside play and indoor creative movement.  Outdoor and indoor space is adequate to allow children room to move freely when doing these types of activities.  Fine motor development is encouraged through a variety of manipulative activities, such as stringing beads, puzzles, lacing cards and Legos.  Additional fine motor activities are provided throughout the learning centers, such as art (drawing and cutting), blocks, science and dramatic play.  Spontaneous physical experimentation is accepted and encouraged to help children gain confidence and success and to help them proceed to new physical skills.

 

1304.21(a) (5) (iii)         Providing an appropriate environment and adult guidance for the participation of

children with special needs.

 

Modification to equipment, materials and activities allow for the participation of children with special needs.  If special equipment is needed in Head Start (HS) or Early Head Start (EHS), the agency will make provisions for the purchase.

 

 

1304.21(a)                    Child development and education approach for all children. (Continued)

 

1304.21(a) (6)               In home-based settings, grantee and delegate agencies must encourage parents to

appreciate the importance of physical development, provide opportunities for children’s outdoor and indoor active play, and guide children in the safe use of equipment and materials.

 

The Early Head Start Home Base option is housed in the Jubilee Community which is located in the Southeast sector of the city. The home-base program accepts infants and toddlers from birth to age three. The program provides services to forty children and their families. Four home visitors called “Coaches” maintain a caseload of 10 families each by providing weekly educational home visits and two group socializations a month. Other key staff includes a Program Supervisor and a Family Advocate.

 

The Home Base option uses the Parent and Learning Strategies (PALS) curriculum which is developed for home base programs. The PALS curriculum consists of sessions that focus on teaching parents to support their child’s social/emotional, cognitive, and language development. Creative Curriculum is another curriculum that the home base option uses which is also used by the Dallas Early Head Start center base program.

 

At age 3, Home Base children are transitioned into regular Head Start or other preschool programs; except for our Early Head Start – Garland Center where there is a three year old classroom.  Children visit the classroom several times before they are transitioned into the room permanently.  

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1304.21(b)                    Child development and education approach for infants and toddlers.

 

1304.21(b) (1)               Grantee and delegate agencies’ program of services for infants and toddlers must

encourage (see 45 CFR 1304.3(a) (5) for a definition of curriculum):

 

1304.21(b) (1) (i)          The development of secure relationships in out-of-home care settings for infants

and toddlers by having a limited number of consistent teachers over an extended period of time.  Teachers must demonstrate an understanding of the child’s family culture and, whenever possible, speak the child’s language (see 45 CFR 1304.52(g) (2));

 

Continuity of Care is implemented to facilitate development of secure relationships for infants and toddlers.  Each child can bond with one teacher and move from room to room throughout the program with that same teacher.  This allows the child/teacher bond to remain secure over an extended period of time.  This allow the teacher to develop a better understanding of the child’s family culture, and ensure that there is an adult present that speaks the child’s language.  This also facilitates consistency in relationships and communication between the teacher, child and parents.

 

1304.21(b) (1) (ii)         Trust and emotional security so that each child can explore the environment

according to his or her developmental level; and

 

Implementing constant care groups provide the opportunity for bonding and building trust between the teacher and the children, thus empowering children to feel secure enough to freely explore their environment according to their developmental level.

 

 

1304.21(b)                    Child development and education approach for infants and toddlers.

(Continued)

 

1304.21(b) (1)               Grantee and delegate agencies’ program of services for infants and toddlers must

encourage (see 45 CFR 1304.3(a) (5) for a definition of curriculum): (Continued)

 

1304.21(b) (1) (iii)        Opportunities for each child to explore a variety of sensory and motor experiences with support and stimulation from teachers and family members.

 

The daily routine provides a variety of sensory and motor experiences for each child to explore.  Sensory experiences are provided through various activities, equipment, toys, materials, environmental adaptations and adult/child interactions.

 

Opportunities for tactile experiences is available in the physical environment through the use of various floor coverings (carpeted/uncarpeted surfaces, blankets, mats, bedding, teachers’ laps and arms; sand, grass, mats and blankets outside) and water play.  Opportunities to explore other textures (such as a variety of surfaces, walls, furniture, bedding, toys and equipment) are also be available.  Toys with different textures (soft, stuffed, soft rubber and plastic, smooth, rough, and bumpy cloth) are available for the child to explore.

 

A variety of auditory stimulation is available to the child through the use of music, records, tapes, teachers' singing, soft sounds (such as wind chimes, bells, rattles), conversations, toys that make sounds and other items as needed.  Classical music is used during quiet and restful times of the day.  A variety of visual stimulation experiences are available through the use of pictures on the walls at the end of cribs, books and equipment.  A wide array of colors are used through providing attractive patterned toys, equipment, and pictures and mirrors at the child’s eye level.  Other items present in the child’s environment to stimulate visual discrimination are fish, plants, mobiles, wind socks outside, bird feeders outside the window, etc.

 

The Early Head Start program is currently using the researched based Creative Curriculum developed by the Diane Twister Dodge and Teaching Strategies.  This comprehensive curriculum focuses on building relationships and providing responsive care.  

 

Other sensory experiences available to the child include the familiar everyday things in their classroom, personal bedding and environment.  The child is able to experience the sense of smell outdoors (flowers, grass, etc.), and indoors including various food smells, play dough and paints.  The child has the opportunity to experience the sense of taste through everyday routine feedings.

 

1304.21(b)                    Child development and education approach for infants and toddlers.

(Continued)

 

1304.21(b) (1)               Grantee and delegate agencies’ program of services for infants and toddlers must

encourage (see 45 CFR 1304.3(a) (5) for a definition of curriculum): (Continued)

 

1304.21(b) (1) (iii)        Opportunities for each child to explore a variety of sensory and motor experiences with support and stimulation from teachers and family members. (Continued)

 

Opportunity to explore a variety of indoor and outdoor motor experiences is provided.  Indoor and outdoor motor experiences include providing the child with rattles, squeak toys, balls, rings, teethers, stacking toys, books, art materials, equipment to crawl or climb on, riding toys and other purchased and natural materials to manipulate. 

 

Infants are allowed to achieve mastery of their bodies through self-initiated motor behavior, such as rolling and sitting.

 

Toddlers are encouraged to develop skills such as pulling up self, walking and climbing.  Infants are provided colorful objects to look at which they can reach for and grasp.  Toddlers are provided large containers full of objects to carry, dump, refill, stack, sort and manipulate. 

 

1304.21(b) (2)               Grantee and delegate agencies must support the social and emotional

development of infants and toddlers by promoting an environment that:

 

1304.21(b) (2) (i)          Encourages the development of self-awareness, autonomy, and self-expression;

and

 

The development of self-awareness, autonomy and self-expression are encouraged through providing the child with places for independent play, opportunities for the child to foster self-awareness through interaction with other children, teachers, self and the parent.  Self-expression is encouraged through the interaction between the teacher and the child (comforting, acknowledging the child’s temperament, moods, cries, smiles, and giggles and by allowing the child to express self through actions, visual cues, verbally and physically).  Staff interacts verbally and nonverbally by smiling, touching, holding, talking with and listening to the child.  Staff gives one-to-one attention to infants during feeding and diapering, allowing time for infants’ responses.  Staff repeat infants’ sounds, talk about things toddlers see and feel, help two-year olds name objects, call children by name and speak with children at eye level.  Staff communicates verbally with individual children during activities and routines, such as arrival, departure, and feeding, diapering and daily routines.

 

 

1304.21(b)                    Child development and education approach for infants and toddlers.

(Continued)

 

1304.21(b) (2)               Grantee and delegate agencies must support the social and emotional

development of infants and toddlers by promoting an environment that: (Continued)

 

1304.21(b) (2) (ii)         Supports the emerging communication skills of infants and toddlers by providing

daily opportunities for each child to interact with others and to express himself or herself freely.

 

Staff encourages emerging communication skills through the use of songs, finger plays, rhymes and poems, and naming objects in the environment.  Staff provides books, dolls, photos and pictures that reflect diverse images as well as those that reflect lives of those in the classroom to encourage verbalization with them and others.  Staff describes actions, experiences, events and routines in the daily environment by verbally labeling objects and events in the child’s experiences.  Children are given opportunities to communicate verbally and nonverbally with other children by interacting with the other children or being allowed to play and explore materials in close proximity to other children doing the same.  Staff talks in a pleasant, calm voice, using simple language and frequent eye contact while being responsive to the infants’ cues.  Staff answers children’s questions, adding more information to what the child says.  Staff labels things in the room with pictures or words.

 

1304.21(b) (3)               Grantee and delegate agencies must promote the physical development of infants

and toddlers by:

 

1304.21(b) (3) (i)          Supporting the development of the physical skills of infants and toddlers including

gross motor skills, such as grasping, pulling, pushing, crawling, walking, and climbing; and

 

A variety of materials and experiences are provided to support the development of physical skills of infants and toddlers.  Infants are encouraged to self-initiate motor development, such as rolling, sitting and walking at their own pace.  Low sturdy furniture is provided for the child to pull up onNon-mobile infants are allowed to move and breathe comfortably, lying on their backs while looking about, kicking, reaching and exploring themselves and toys provided.  Floor mirrors are provided for non-mobile and mobile infants to look at themselves.  Time, space and objects (ramps, platforms, and low steps) are provided to encourage toddlers’ active play, such as sitting, walking, climbing and jumping.  Other items provided to facilitate physical development include objects for toting, carrying, stacking, filling, dumping and riding.

 

1304.21(b)                    Child development and education approach for infants and toddlers.

(Continued)

 

1304.21(b) (3)               Grantee and delegate agencies must promote the physical development of infants

and toddlers by: (Continued)

 

1304.21(b) (3) (ii)         Creating opportunities for fine motor development that encourage the control and

coordination of small, specialized motions, using the eyes, mouth, hands, and feet.

 

Opportunities for fine motor development that encourage the control and coordination of small, specialized motions and using the eyes, mouth, hands and feet will be provided through the use of a variety of materials, such as teethers, rings, pop-beads, rattles, squeak toys, large wooden spools and beads, books, puzzles, crayons and other items as needed.  Toddlers are encouraged to feed themselves, draw, use finger plays and use other materials to encourage motor skills.

 

1304.21(c)                    Child development and education approach for preschoolers.

 

1304.21(c) (1)               Grantee and delegate agencies, in collaboration with the parents, must implement

a curriculum (see 45 CFR 1304.3(a) (5)) that:

 

1304.21(c) (1) (i)           Supports each child’s individual pattern of development and learning;

 

HS ACT642 (5) (6)       Use research-based assessment methods that reflect the characteristics

                                    Described in section 641A (b) (2) in order to support the educational

                                    Instruction and school readiness of children in the program;

                                    Use research-based developmental screening tools that have been

                                    demonstrated to be standardized. Reliable, valid, and accurate for

                                    the child being assessed, to the maximum extent practicable, for the

                                    purpose of meeting the relevant standards described in section 641A (a) (1).

 

Teachers individualize for children based on information gathered through the portfolio, the parents, the health and dental screenings, and the Learning Accomplishment Profile Screen (LAP-D) the developmental screening tool that is research-based and standardized and the Learning Accomplishment Profile Revised Edition (LAP-3) the on-going assessment tool that is research-based and criterion referenced.  Each child new to the Head Start program is given the LAP-D Screen to determine what the child’s individual strengths and needs are and what the teachers will address when planning for the child the first two to three weeks of school.  The results of the LAP-3 assessment are a major part of curriculum planning and individualization.  Head Start teachers begin to administer the LAP-3 on-going Assessment on all second year children within three weeks of their return to the center.  This information is stored in the HSFIS file and will be shared with the parents.  Some portions of the developmental assessments will be shared with the child’s next placement into kindergarten if the parent gives permission.  Each child’s individual needs and learning patterns are taken into consideration when planning.  Individualized activities are planned on the lesson plans and noted with each child’s individual numbers. Early Head Start uses the Denver II as their developmental screening tool which is research-based and standardized and the e-LAP is being used as the on-going assessment tool also research-based and criterion referenced.  Vogel Alcove staff (social worker and Developmental Coordinator) use the Denver PDQ to screen children within 45 days of entry into the program.  Vogel conducts the on-going assessment (from the Big Day for Pre-k Assessment) pre-mid and post results are documented into the database.  The Head Start Education Coordinator monitors the education and assessment portion of the program.

 

Head Start of Greater Dallas’ ISD partners are in various stages of use of their assessment tools; Lancaster ISD has adopted the Opening the World of Learning (OWL) Curriculum and the Assessment Tool however they will continue to use the LAP-D Screen and the LAP -3 Assessment until all the their teachers have been trained.  The Dallas ISD also adopted the OWL Curriculum and Assessment and in their first year of implementation the OWL screener, and on-going Assessment.  The Irving ISD continues to use the Scholastic Curriculum and the I-Station Assessment which is a screener and on-going assessment tool children can use at the computer.

 

All LAP-3 data is aggregated and analyzed three times per year at the beginning, mid and end of each school year.  On-going data is used to help teachers plan for the children, assist the mentor coaches in identifying teachers that may need additional support and in some cases develop training plans for teachers.  At the end of the year all raw scores are aggregated and analyzed and used as part of the agency’s evaluation and planning.  Data is used to determine additional programs such as the agency’s Science and Math and Dual Language Policy to Practice program.  Some data analysis showed children were behind in the areas of science, math and our dual language learners were not scoring at the desired level. 

 

Parents are given reports from the LAP-3 results three times per year.  The teachers, education specialists and coordinators used aggregated data to plan for children, and identify developmental growth patterns and professional development base on developmental classroom patterns.

 

HS ACT 642(3) (A)       Implement a research-based early childhood curriculum that promotes young

(B)                               children’s school readiness in the areas of language and cognitive development

                                    early reading, and mathematic skills, socio-emotional development, physical

                                    development, and approaches to learning. Is based on scientifically valid

                                    research and has standardized training procedures and curriculum materials

                                    to support implementation;

 

HS ACT642 (14) (A)     Coordinating activities and collaborating to ensure that curricula used in the

(iii)                               Head Start program are aligned with the Head Start Child Outcomes Frame

                                    work, as developed by the Secretary; promote alignment of curricula used in

                                    Head Start programs and continuity of services with the Head Start Child

                                    Development Early Learning Framework and, as appropriate, State early learning

                                    Standards.                                                  

 

The teachers use the Scholastic Big Day for Pre-K Curriculum.  Each unit centers on one central theme but incorporates several relative themes that web from the central theme.  The Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework, the Texas Pre-Kindergarten Guidelines and the Texas Essentials Knowledge and Skills for Kindergarten (TEKS) are aligned to this curriculum.  The Scholastic Big Day for Pre-K Curriculum is on of the state adopted curriculums list. Head Start of Greater Dallas has made a concentrated effort to align its curriculum when possible to our local school districts to ensure children have a smooth and seamless transition into the public kindergarten sector.

 

The Early Head Start program is currently using the researched base Creative

                                    Curriculum developed by Diane Twister Doge and Teaching Strategies.  This

                                    is a comprehensive curriculum focuses on building relationships and providing

                                    responsive care.  This curriculum is rich with parent resources and activities for

                                    home use.

 

HS ACT642 (5) (A)       Enter into a memorandum of understanding, not later than 1 year after the date

(i)                                 of enactment of the Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007,

                                    With the appropriate local entity responsible for managing publicly funded

                                    Preschool programs in the service are of the Head Start agency, that shall

                                    Provide for a review of each of the activities described in clause (ii);

 

Head Start of Greater Dallas staff work closely with local independent school districts and community based child care providers to ensure curriculums and assessments tools will meet the needs of all children in the Head Start community.  HSGD has three teachers that are Dallas Independent School District’s employees working in the three of the Head Start Centers, Ferguson Oates, Socorro Gonzales, Sunnyview and Bachman centers as part of the district and state’s school integration.

 

A Memorandum of Understanding is established year to year as teachers are replaced or added to additional Head Start Centers.  Head Start Teachers have the opportunity to attend special joint trainings that are offered during the summer by the independent school districts.  Head Start teachers also are invited to attend monthly staff development with the assigned Independent School District Teacher working in their centers. Topics include school readiness activities and curriculum alignment.

 

 

1304.21(c)                    Child development and education approach for preschoolers. (Continued)

 

1304.21(c) (1)               Grantee and delegate agencies, in collaboration with the parents, must implement

a curriculum (see 45 CFR 1304.3(a) (5)) that: (Continued)

 

1304.21(c) (1) (ii)          Provides for the development of cognitive skills by encouraging each child to

organize his or her experiences to understand concepts and to develop age appropriate literacy, numeracy, reasoning, problem solving and decision-making skills which form a foundation for school readiness and later success;

 

As children move toward the symbolic thought process, opportunities for activities (such as dramatic play and make believe) will be provided to strengthen their memory, language, logical reasoning, imagination and creativity.  Activities (such as labeling, classifying, sorting and seriation) are planned on a daily basis.  Open-ended questions are used to encourage language development as well as exploration.  There are hands-on science activities, science activities through computer software, natural events such as seeds growing and the life cycle of pets.  The development of language is supported by the use of open-ended questions, reading to children, having children “read” to each other, using poems, having children talk about their pictures and experiences and having teachers write down what the children say, allowing time for conversation.

                                   

As part of the daily schedule which may vary in each center children are encouraged to record their thoughts and ideas in their Journal with the help of the teachers. Journaling is a developmentally appropriate way to help children organize their thoughts on paper and develop language and literacy skills.                          

           

1304.21(c) (1) (iii)         Integrates all educational aspects of the health, nutrition, and mental health

                                    services into program activities.

 

Health activities are integrated throughout the classroom in the various learning centers, such as dramatic play as a doctor’s office, discovery area with medical tools, and the library with books on hospitals, medical transport, etc.  In addition, the Super Brush Curriculum is used to teach the importance of good dental health.  Nutrition activities are planned weekly and recorded on the class lesson plan and in addition to the teachers’ activities, the Nutrition Specialist comes into the classroom at least twice a year to conduct activities with the children.  Teachers use the "Second Step" Substance Abuse Prevention Curriculum as part of their weekly planning on the lesson plans.

 

1304.21(c) (1) (iv)         Ensures that the program environment helps children develop emotional security

and facility in social relationships;

 

Socially and emotionally, teachers help children develop positive relationships with other children and adults.  Children’s efforts at solving their own difficulties and disagreement are encouraged and reinforced, and teachers will help children see their successes reflected in the positive responses of other children and adults.  Additional opportunities for success occur through the child’s development and practice of self-help skills such as participation in family style meal service.  Children are initially assisted with these tasks but are encouraged to gain increasing independence.  This reinforces the child’s development of positive self-concepts and the development of personal success.

 

1304.21(c)                    Child development and education approach for preschoolers. (Continued)

 

1304.21(c) (1) (iv)         Ensures that the program environment helps children develop emotional security

and facility in social relationships;

 

A conflict management program is currently being used in all of the Head Start classrooms.  The “Second Step” curriculum is used by teachers as a resource in the classroom planning to promote health, safety and self esteem. 

 

1304.21(c) (1)               Grantee and delegate agencies, in collaboration with the parents, must implement

a curriculum (see 45 CFR 1304.3(a) (5)) that: (Continued)

 

Service Delivery Plan - 2012

 

1304.21(c) (1) (v)          Enhances each child’s understanding of self as an individual and as a member of

a group;

 

1304.21(c) (1) (vi)         Provides each child with opportunities for success to help develop feelings of

competence, self-esteem, and positive attitudes toward learning; and

 

Teachers allow children time to talk about their experiences, families and cultures.  Teachers use children’s names frequently.  When possible, photos of children as well as family members will be displayed in the classrooms.  Artwork done by the children is around the rooms and the center in general.  Children are given many opportunities for successfully completing tasks through activities planned by the teacher.  Children are acknowledged for the efforts they make in accomplishing skills.

 

1304.21(c) (1) (vii)        Provides individual and small group experiences both indoors and outdoors.

 

The daily schedule as well as the plans made by the teachers allow for individual and small group indoor and outdoor activities, such as story time in small groups, computer time in groups of two, small group art time, small group cooking experiences, etc.

 

1304.21(c) (2)               Staff must use a variety of strategies to promote and support children’s learning

and developmental progress based on the observations and ongoing assessment of each child (see 45 CFR 1304.20(b), 1304.20(d), and 1304.20(e)).

 

The teachers use a portfolio approach to determine the needs and plans for the children in their classrooms.  The portfolio includes Parent Comment Sheet, LAP-3 on-going assessment reports, twenty anecdotal notes per year, Home Visits Forms, and Parent/Teacher Conference Forms, as well as information the parent shares about the child’s development. In addition to these items, the portfolio may also contain audio tapes of the child, pictures of the child that would chart the progression from the beginning of the school year to the end (examples: small and large block building or tying of shoes, etc.).  and examples of the child’s work (writing & drawing or dictation).  Activity charts may also be used.

 

 

KM\SD Plans2011\130421Ed