Table of Contents

 

 

  I.   Educational Program                                                                                                                        

 

        A.       Educational Program Overview                                                                                           

        B.       Mission Statement                                                                                                                 

        C.       Philosophy                                                                                                                              

        D.       Educational Programs                                                                                                           

        E.       General Timeline                                                                                                                   

        F.       Education Advisory Committee                                                                                          

        G.       Educational Job Descriptions                                                                                              

        H.       Education Content Area Plan                                                                                               

       

 

II.   Curriculum

                  A.        Thematic Approach                                                                                                   

                  B.        The Big Day at Pre-K Program                                                                                 

                  C.        Scholastic Thematic Units                                                                                                       

                  D.        How to Use the Big Day at Pre-K                                                                            

                                                                                                                                      

                 

III.   Assessment

                 A.       Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP-3)                                                                                      

                 B.       Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP-D Screen)                                                                                          

                 C.         LAP Guidelines                                                                                                                       

                                                                                                                                                                    

 

IV.            Early Childhood Educational Principles                            

                  A.        Appropriate Practices                                                                                                

                  B.        Multicultural Principles                                                                                            

                  C.        The Value of Play                                                                                                                     

                  D.        Behavioral Guidance                                                                                                 

                  E.         Team Teaching                                                                                                           

                  F.      Inclusion of Special Needs Children                                                                                        

                  G.      End of Year Celebrations                                                                                                         

                                                                                                                                                                

 

V.              Program Quality Assurance

 

        A.       Federal, State & Local Standards                                                                                                                         

                  a.         Revised Performance Standards                                                                              

                  b.         Minimum Standards /Texas Department of Human Services                                     

                  c.         Accreditation Standards (NAEYC)                                                                                 

                  d.         Dual Language Policy to Practice                                                                            

 

VI.            Policies & Procedures

                  a.         Basic Daily Classroom Schedule                                                                             

                  b.         Room Arrangement                                                                                                    

                  c.       Classroom Environment Checklist                                                                                                                     

                  d.        Labeling                                                                                                                               

                  e.         Learning Centers                                                                                                                       

                  f.          Additional Indoor Space                                                                                           

                  g.         Daily Routines                                                                                                            

                  h.         Daily Check In of Children Procedure                                                                                                                                                 

                  i.          Rest Room Procedure   

                  k.         Toothbrush                                                                                           

               j.         MealTimeProcedure Procedure                                                                                               

                  l.          Outdoor Procedure                                                                                                    

                 m.        Teaching Files                                                                                                                             

                 n.         Transfer of Children                                                                                                  

                  o.         Center Accident Report                                                                                            

                  p.         Access to Children’s Records                                                                                  

                                                                                                                                                                                           

VII.           Emergency Procedures

                 

                                                                                                                                                                   

VIII.         Additional Documentation and Forms

             

                    

IX.            Training for Parents                                                                                                                                                         

                

 

 

HEAD START of Greater Dallas Inc.

 

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES

 

EDUCATION CONTENT AREA

 

REVISED SPRING 2012

 

 

 

 

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

 

Educational Program Overview

 

HEAD START of Greater Inc. provides young children from birth through preschool age from low-income families with free, high quality child development services.  Head Start children explore and learn in a healthy, nurturing environment, while building self-confidence and social skills.  Also, they receive complete medical and dental services.  Children with special needs are welcomed into the program and receive individual attention from Special Services staff.  Children leave Head Start with a strong foundation for successful learning in school.

 

 

 

Mission Statement

 

“HEAD START of Greater Dallas” provides children with the foundation of skills and knowledge they need to be successful in school and life and fosters self-reliant families and communities.

 

 

 

HEAD START of Greater Dallas' Educational Philosophy

 

HEAD START of Greater Dallas adheres to the philosophy that parents are the prime educators of their children.  The Educational Program provides parents with the opportunity to increase their knowledge of child growth and development, an opportunity to learn additional parenting skills, and, also an opportunity to learn how to work more effectively with their own children.

 

Head Start works to enrich children with a learning environment and varied experiences appropriate to their age, stage of development and cultural background, which will help them to develop socially, intellectually, physically and emotionally.

 

Before a teacher can guide the daily activities of a Head Start classroom, he or she must clearly understand the philosophy of the program.  Since 1965, Head Start has provided early childhood education opportunities for zero to five year old children whose families are economically disadvantaged.  Head Start Program Goals state that:

 

 

  A.

The Head Start Program is based on the premise that all children share certain educational needs, and that children of low-income families, in particular can benefit from a comprehensive developmental program to meet those needs.  The Head Start Program approach is based on the philosophy that:

  1. A child can benefit most from a comprehensive, interdisciplinary program to foster development and remedy problems as expressed
  2. The child's entire family, as well as the community, must be involved.  The program should maximize the strengths and experiences of each child. which is perceived as the principle influence on the child's development, must be a direct participant in the program.  Local communities are allowed latitude in developing creative program designs so long as the basic goals, objectives and standards of a comprehensive program are adhered to.
B.

The overall goal of the Head Start Program is to bring about a greater degree of social and intellectual l l competence in children of low-income families. Social competence; is the child’s effectiveness in dealing with both his/or her present environment and later responsibilities in school life.  Social competence takes into account the interrelatedness of cognitive and intellectual development, physical and mental health, nutritional needs and other factors that enable a developmental approach to helping children achieve socially and intellectually.  To the accomplishment of this goal; Head Start objectives and performance standards provide for:

  1.

The improvement of the child's health and physical abilities, including appropriate steps to correct present physical and mental problems and  to enhance every child's access to an adequate diet, and the improvement of the family's attitude toward future health care and physical abilities.

  2.

The improvement of the child's health and physical abilities, including appropriate steps to correct present physical and mental problems and to enhance every child's access to an adequate diet, and the improvement of the family's attitude toward future health care and physical abilities.

                                          

The improvement of the child's health and physical abilities, including appropriate steps to correct present physical and mental problems and  to enhance every child's access to an adequate diet, and the improvement of the family's attitude toward future health care and physical abilities.

 

  

Educational Programs

 

HEAD START of Greater Dallas offers two types of educational programs for young children:

 

I.  Early Head Start

         A.  The Early Head Start program provides comprehensive services to pregnant women, infants, and children under age three.

         B.    Individualized services for each child ensure a healthy and successful start in life.

         C.    Pregnant women receive medical and other support services during their pregnancy and after the baby arrives.

         D.    Early Head Start staff

                1. Program Director        

                2. Education Coordinators (two)

                3. Early Head Start Teachers

                4. Family Advocates

                5. Pediatric nurse

                6. Disabilities and Mental Health Specialists

                7. Other support staff

 

II. Head Start for Preschoolers

A.     There are 20 Head Start centers located throughout Dallas County. 

B.      The centers are open from 7:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

C.   Head Start staff

                1. Site-Manager

                2. Education Specialists I or Education Specialists II

                3. Classroom Teachers

a.      Teacher II

b.      Teacher III

                4.  Other Support Staff   

 

III. Head Start Partners

           A.  Dallas Independent School District

           B.  Irving Independent School District

           C.  Lancaster Independent School District

           D.  Vogel Alcove

 

 

GENERAL TIME LINE

 

August Begin LAP-D Screen with all new children (Screen NEW children within 45 days of entry). For each child complete Information from Assessment and Observation Form based on the LAP-D Screen. The Education Specialist will assist the teachers.  Place the form in the child’s Portfolio.
August Begin On-going Assessment on all Returning children within three weeks of them re-entering the classroom.

July-                       September

Begin Home Visits (LAP-D Screen or LAP-3 Pre Assessment report from previous year). Give forms to Education Specialist as visits are completed.

August -              

September          

LAP-3 Pre Assessment completed for each child. 
For each child print Individual Outcomes by Domain Report, complete information from the Assessment and Observation Form and use for individual planning. Place in each child’s Portfolio.  Data entered in data base by Education Specialist or Teacher.
November

Fall Parent /Teacher Conference (LAP-3 Pre Assessment).  Give forms to Education Specialist.

December-          

January

 
LAP-3 mid Assessment completed for each child

For each child print Individual Outcomes by Domain report, complete Information from Assessment and Observation Form use for individual planning.  Place in child’s Portfolio. Portfolio reviewed by Education Specialist. Data recorded in LAP-3 Profile Data base by Education Specialist or Teacher.

February-              

March                 

Spring Home Visits (LAP-3 Mid Assessment Parent Report). 
Give forms to Education Specialist.
April:

Week of the Young Child

April-May          

 

Spring Parent/Teacher Conference.   Give forms to Education Specialist   Education Specialist delivers necessary forms to Transition 

April/May

LAP-3 Post Assessment completed for each child. 
For each print Individual Outcomes by Domain report, complete an Information from Assessment and Observation Form and use for individual planning. Place in each child’s Portfolio. Data entered in data base by Education Specialist or Teacher.

 

EDUCATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE

 

 

1. This committee is comprised of Head Start staff, Head Start parents, and other professionals in the child development     community. 

 

2.  The purpose is to act as a resource for enhancing the educational program. 

 

3.  Educational materials are reviewed, revised and established by this committee. 

 

4.  The Education Service Delivery Plan is also reviewed and updated by the committee.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JOB DESCRIPITIONS:

 

Education Services Director

 

 

EDUCATION COORDINATORS

 

 

EDUCATION SPECIALISTS

 

 

TEACHER II

 

 

TEACHER III

 

 

HEAD START of Greater Dallas, Inc.

 

                         EDUCATION SERVICES DIRECTOR

                POSITION DESCRIPTION

 

 

POSITION TITLE:         Education Services Director                         CLASSIFICATION: Exempt

DEPARTMENT:  Education Services                                      APPROVED BY:

_____________________________________________________________________________

REPORTING RELATIONSHIPS

 

Position reports to:         Head Start Director

Position supervised:        Education Coordinators

_____________________________________________________________________________

POSITION PURPOSE:

The Education Services Director is responsible for (A) the execution of all Education Services for the agency.  This responsibility includes ensuring that all centers provide a quality child development program that is designed and implemented to meet the needs of the whole child (from birth to age five), with appropriate curriculum, a physical environment conducive to learning and a supportive home/school relationship: (B) ensures that guidance, support and training are provided to parents and staff: (C) maintains the integrity of all Education activities in each center in the HEAD START of Greater Dallas structure: (D) works closely with community agencies and groups as well as program Associated Head Start Directors, Special Service/Mental Health Director, Content Area Managers, and Site Managers to ensure that the Performance Standards and other program guidelines are met in each location.     

______________________________________________________________________________

 

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS AND BASIC DUTIES

 

1.       QUALITY – the extent to which an employee’s work is accurate, thorough and neat.

 

Serves on curriculum development committees for school districts to help them understand the importance of an appropriate curriculum for children through eight years of age.  Works with at least two committees per year.

 

Works with the Head Start Director and Chief Finance Officer to ensure that the funds allocated for Education are budgeted appropriately each year to ensure the integrity of the Education Content Area. 

 

Form relationships with Universities and Colleges to recruit Bachelor and Master level students to utilize Head Start as a learning environment.  There should be a minimum of two students per year.

 

Responsible for developing or obtaining relevant Education materials for staff and parents and explaining there importance in the educational process for children 0-5 years of age.  Review materials annually for dated information. 

 

Along with the Education Coordinators, help Teachers understand the skills that children will need for their next educational placement and assists in designing materials and identifying resources to enhance their opportunities for success.  Reviews annually.

 

Helps staff advance program quality by supporting them in linking current research, resources and program data to their practice and by discussing program quality issues and ways to advance practice.

 

 Advocates for resources to improve program quality by offering suggestions and providing information about needed resources during the program’s planning and budget development process.

 

Attends training conferences to continuously update the agency’s knowledge regarding educational activities.

 

Helps ensure that the staffing structure supports the program’s mission and goals by maintaining an adequate number of qualified staff who meets position requirements.

 

Advances staff performance by meting regularly with individual staff to provide performance feedback based on expectations contained in job descriptions, program plans, and policies and procedures.

 

Builds on staff that advances the program’s mission by hiring and promoting qualified staff who support the program’s philosophy and goals and who culturally and linguistically represent the community and program and by training all staff on the program’s philosophy, and requirements.

 

Performs other related duties as assigned.

 

2.      PRODUCTIVITY – the extent to which an employee produces a significant volume of work efficiently in a specified period of time.          

 

Receives and prepares all information for submission to the federal government relating to the Program Information Report (PIR) and other information that might be needed.  To be completed annually.

 

Develops strategies annually that will ensure there are communication systems in place between HSGD & Early Head Start staff and their counterparts in the schools and other child care settings, including principals, teachers, and community child care personnel to facilitate continuity of programming.

 

Participates in the Advisory Committees of the agency, serving as a resource person for education activities that are a woven part of each area should be reviewed annually.

 

Along with the Special Services/Mental Health Director, meets quarterly to review special education and classroom issues that may impact the delivery of services.

 

Attends at least three meetings per year of organizations that represent the child-care community and serves as a positive.

 

Maintains 60 hours of training related to Early Childhood Development or other job related skills (training conducted is included). 

 

3.      JOB KNOWLEDGE – the extent to which an employee possesses the practical/technical knowledge required on the job requirements

 

Meets with universities and colleges to recruit Bachelor and Master level students to utilize Head Start as a learning environment.  There should me a minimum of three students per year.

 

Meets with the Staff Development/Career Resource Associates to develop yearly training schedule for staff in areas that have been identified career planning, observation and performance evaluations as a need.

 

Ensures that all Triads have relevant training in the area of Education and are recipients of current technology in this area, there should be at least one training per quarter.

 

Along with Content Area Managers prepare parents to exercise their rights and responsibilities concerning the education of their children in the school setting by providing appropriate training activities.  Trainings should occur annually.

 

Builds an understanding of the program by communicating its philosophy, mission, and services to staff, families, and the community and by supporting staff to do the same.

 

Ensures that work area is clean, secure and well maintained.

 

4.      RELIABILITY – the extent to which an employee can be relied upon regarding task completion and follow-up.

 

Facilitates communication with others by using available technologies (e.g., fax, voice-mail, computers-e-mail, file sharing) and by supporting staff to do the same.

 

Supports staff retention by creating an environment that fosters equity and provides opportunities for professional growth.

 

Responsible for immediate technical assistance when requested by either staff or parents.

 

5.      ATTENDANCE – the extent to which an employee is punctual, observes prescribes work break/meal periods and has an acceptable overall attendance record.

 

Is responsible for personal check-in/out procedures on a daily basis.

 

Is accountable for any time away from the office during scheduled work hours, i.e. meetings, conferences, center visits.

 

6.      INDEPENDENCE – the extent to which an employee performs work with little or no supervision.

 

Ability to make decisions within agency’s policies and procedures.

 

 

7.      CREATIVITY – the extent to which an employee possesses ideas, finds new and better ways of doing things.

 

Staying within the guidelines suggested in the Head Start Performance Standards uses knowledge and experience to create an environment that will allow education specialists, teachers and other staff the opportunity to be part of a team.

 

Has the ability to use resources and provide training and guidance creatively.

 

8.      INITIATIVE – the extent to which an employee seeks out new assignments and            

assumes additional duties when necessary.

 

Maintains annual membership of the Head Start Association, National Association for the Education of Young Children or other organizations involved in the education of young children and their families.

 

 

 

Furthers professional growth by seeking feedback, reflecting on and assessing own practice, and taking advantage of opportunities to improve skills and knowledge.

 

9.      ADHERENCE TO POLICY – to the extent to which an employee follows safety and conduct rules, other regulations and adheres to all policies.

 

Advances staff performance by meeting regularly with individual staff to provide performance feedback based on expectations contained in job descriptions, program plans and monitor progress.

 

Supports staff retention by creating an environment that fosters equity and provides opportunities for professional growth.

 

Ensures program’s adherence to applicable federal, state, local and program standards, policies and/or procedures by keeping abreast of these requirements and by promoting staff’s understanding and implementation of them.

 

Promotes staff development by using reflective supervision and the performance appraisal system to assess staff skills and interests, establish professional development goals and plans, and monitor progress.

 

10.   INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS – the extent to which an employee is willing and demonstrates the ability to cooperate, work, and communicate with coworkers, supervisors, customers, vendors and subordinates.

 

Builds an understanding of the program by communicating its philosophy, mission, and services to staff, families, and the community and by supporting staff to do the same.

 

Demonstrates respect for others by sharing information objectively and non-judgmentally and adjusting verbal and written communication strategies for different audiences.

 

Daily assist other team members that need help in meeting the needs of children and families.

 

 

11.   JUDGEMENT – the extent to which an employee demonstrates proper judgment and decision-making skills when necessary.

 

Demonstrates the ability to use sound judgment when interacting with staff, parents, and community.

 

Minimizes the agency’s financial and legal risk by assessing exposures liability, improving internal controls and other program practices, training staff and monitoring their compliance with requirements.

 

Must have ability to make decisions when necessary as the need arises.

 

 

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS

 

 

QUALIFICATIONS

 

Education/Certificate:

Bachelor degree in Child Development, Early Childhood Education; Master’s degree in Child Development, Early Childhood Education

 

Required Knowledge:

Knowledge of Early Head Start or Head Start regulations

 

Knowledge of the independent school district

 

Knowledge of budget

 

Experience Required:

Bachelor degree in above, must have five to seven years of successful experience working with children and families.

 

Master’s degree in the above, must have 2 years of successful experience working with children and families.

 

Skills/Abilities:

Intermediate computer skills

 

Excellent verbal and written communication skills

______________________________________________________________________________

 

PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES AND REQUIREMENTS OF THIS POSITION

 

Finger dexterity:

Using primarily just the fingers to make small movement such as using computer keyboard, picking up small objects.

 

Talking:

Able to convey detailed important information instruction or ideas, accurately, loudly or quickly.

 

Average hearing:

Able to hear average or normal conversation and receive ordinary information.

 

Repetitive motions:

Movements frequently and regularly required using the wrist, hands, and fingers.

 

Average visual abilities:

Ability to see, read and view computer with or without corrective lenses.                                                   

 

Physical strength: 

Sedentary work, sitting most of the time, some walking, able to lift up to 40 lbs of force

______________________________________________________________________________

 

WORKING CONDITIONS: No hazardous or significantly unpleasant conditions.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

MENTAL ACTIVITIES AND REQUIREMENTS OF THIS POSITION

 

Reasoning ability:

Ability to apply common sense understanding to carry out instructions in written, oral, or diagram form. 

 

Ability to deal with problems and provide solutions

 

Mathematics ability:

Ability to add, subtract, multiply and divide.

 

Language ability:

Ability to speak and read English fluently.

 

Ability to read and interpret documents such as personnel policies, procedures manuals. 

 

Ability to write routine reports and correspondence. 

 

Ability to speak before groups or employees.

 

 

 

INTENT AND FUNCTION OF JOB DESCRIPTIONS

 

 

Job descriptions assist organizations in ensuring that the hiring process is fairly administered and that qualified employees are selected.  They are also essential to an effective appraisal system and related promotion, transfer, layoff, and termination decisions.  Well constructed job descriptions are an integral part of any effective compensation system.

 

All descriptions have been reviewed to ensure that only essential functions and basic duties have been included.  Peripheral tasks, only incidentally related to each position, have been excluded.  Requirements, skills and abilities included have been determined to be the minimal standards required to successfully perform the positions.  In no instance, however, should the duties, responsibilities, and requirements delineated to be interpreted as all inclusive.  Additional functions and requirements may be assigned by supervisors as deemed appropriate.

 

In accordance with the Americans with disabilities Act, it is possible that requirements may be modified to reasonably accommodate disabled individuals.  However, no accommodations will be made which may use serious health or safety risks to the employee or others or which impose undue hardships on the organization.

 

Job descriptions are not intended as and do not create employment contracts.  The organization maintains its status as an at-will employer:  Employees can be terminated for any reason not prohibited by law.

 

 

 

  EDUCATION COORDINATORS

POSITION DESCRIPTION

 

POSITION TITLE: Education Coordinator                            CLASSIFICATION: Exempt

DEPARTMENT:                                                                          APPROVED BY:

 

REPORTING RELATIONSHIPS

 

Position reports to: Education Services Director

Position supervised:

 

POSITION PURPOSE:

The Education Coordinator shall establish and maintain an organizational structure that supports the accomplishments of program objectives.

 

 

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS AND BASIC DUTIES

 

1.      QUALITY – the extent to which an employee’s work is accurate, thorough and neat.

 

The Education Coordinator is responsible for ensuring that all centers provide a quality child development program that is designed and implemented to meet the needs of the whole child, with appropriate curriculum, a physical environment conducive to learning, and a supportive home/school relationship. 

 

The Education Coordinator is the resource person for designated Centers in the child development field and provides guidance, support and training to staff and parents. 

 

The Education Coordinator works closely with other program staff, Site Managers, community agencies and groups to ensure program quality and compliance.

 

Ensures that all centers provide a learning environment and experiences to help the children develop emotionally socially, physically and cognitively, appropriate to their age and stage of development and assist all centers in providing age and developmentally appropriate curriculum.  Classrooms monitored at least 3 times per year with documentation.

 

Provides guidance to all assigned centers in obtaining and retaining NAEYC accreditation, should be monitored annually.

 

Meets monthly with Site Managers, Coordinators and Education staff to discuss challenges and responsibilities, with a pre- written agenda and predetermined meeting goals.

 

Should conduct on-site reviews of records in each center at least quarterly, including the content and quality of Learning Accomplishments Profile (LAP-3), portfolios and other relevant educational assessments.  If deficiencies are found, reports those to the Quality Assurance Department, Site Managers, Associate Head Start Directors and the Education Services Director.  The report should be specific to findings and recommendations.

 

Ensures all services provided are within the prescribed time.  Reports problems when noted with recommendations to the Education Services Director.  Monthly reports should be given to the Education Services Director that reflects work done in the centers.

 

Assist Education Specialists in developing activities to enhance parent conferences and home visits, twice per year for each.

 

Ensures that all services provided are within the prescribed time.  Reports problems when noted Helps staff advance program quality by supporting them in linking current research, resources and program data to their practice and by discussing program quality issues and ways to advance practice.

 

 Advocates for resources to improve program quality by offering suggestions and providing information about needed resources during the program’s planning and budget development process.

 

Helps ensure that the staffing structure support the program’s mission and goal by maintaining an adequate number of qualified staff who meet position requirements.

 

Advances staff performance by meeting regularly with individual staff to provide performance feedback based on expectation contained in job descriptions, program plans and polices and procedures.

 

Helps staff advance program quality by supporting them in linking current research, resources and program  data to their practice and by discussing program quality issues and ways to advance

 

2.      PRODUCTIVITY – the extent to which an employee produces a significant volume of work efficiently in a specified period of time.

 

Works closely with the Education Content Area to update the Standard Operation Procedures Manual as needed to reflect new local, state, and federal regulations.  Ensures that forms used by the agency are kept current and available for distribution.  This should be done yearly. 

 

Improves efficiency and effectiveness by using technology to enhance and/or create systems to share and track information about service delivery.

 

Facilitates communication with others by using available technologies (e.g., fax, voice-mail, computers-e-mail, file sharing).

 

3.      JOB KNOWLEDGE – the extent to which an employee possesses the practical/technical knowledge required on the job.

 

Assist Education Specialists and Teachers in the operations of the LAP-3 process including Palms.

 

Along with the Education Services Director works closely with the other Content Area staff to involve parents in the organization and delivery of the education programs and assures the integration of all areas into the education program.  Interaction should take place at least quarterly.

 

Works closely with staff to provide opportunities for parent involvement in the education programs and to increase their child observation skills through training/workshops at least three times per quarter.

 

The Education Coordinator is expected to sit in on screening committees for the hiring of agency’s teaching staff.  Seventy five percent of the time.

 

Seeks training opportunities available in the community and works closely with the Staff Development/Career Resource Associates to develop training plans for each Triad. This is reviewed quarterly.

 

Responsible for immediate technical assistance when requested, serves as a resource to the centers in the areas of Education and training, and documents assistance provided.

 

Collaborates with outside sources concerning appropriate educational strategies and works to bring resources into centers.  Reviews annually.

 

Executes plans and policies by developing procedures, protocols, and schedules that ensure their full implementation.

 

Builds an understanding of the program by communicating its philosophy, mission and services to staff, families and the community and by supporting staff to do the same.

 

4.      RELIABILITY – to the extent to which employee can be relied upon regarding task completion and follow-up.

 

The Education Coordinator spends at least fifty percent of time training in the areas of early childhood development, curriculum, individualization, and teacher interactions.

 

Submits a monthly completion of goals and activities with accomplishments per assigned center.

 

5.      ATTENDANCE – the extent, to which an employee is punctual, observes prescribes work break/meal periods and an acceptable overall attendance record.

 

Is accountable for any time away from the center during scheduled work hours, i.e. meetings,

center visits, community meetings and conferences.

 

 

6.      INDEPENDENCE – the extent to which an employee performs work with little or no supervision.

 

The ability to make decisions within agency policies and procedures.

 

7.      CREATIVITY – the extent, to which an employee possesses ideas, finds new and better ways of doing things.

 

Represents the community’s cultural and linguistic diversity throughout the program by ensuring that staff, committees, practices, materials, and activities reflect this diversity.

 

Has the ability to use resources and provide training and guidance creatively.

 

8.      INITIATIVE – the extent to which an employee seeks out new assignments and assumes additional duties when necessary.

 

Maintains annual membership of the Head Start Association, National Association for the Education of Young Children or other organizations involved in the education of young children and their families.

 

Furthers professional growth by seeking feedback, reflecting on and assessing own practice, and taking advantage of opportunities to improve skills and knowledge.

 

Promotes a collaborative, productive working environment by following established communication protocols, clearly articulating expectations, outcomes, and timelines, and using conflict resolution and negotiation skills when needed.

 

9.      ADHERENCE TO POLICY – the extent to which an employee follows safety and conduct rules, other regulations and adheres to all policies.

 

Supports staff retention by creating an environment that fosters equity and provides opportunities for professional growth.

 

Builds an understanding of the program by communicating its philosophy, mission, and services to staff, families, and the community and by supporting staff to do the same.

 

Ensures program’s adherence to applicable federal, state, local, and program standards, policies, and/or procedures by keeping abreast of these requirements and by promoting staff’s understanding and implementation of them.

 

10.   INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS – the extent to which an employee is willing and demonstrates the ability to cooperate, work, and communicate with co-workers, supervisors, customers, vendors, and subordinates.

 

Builds an understanding of the program by communicating its philosophy, mission, and services to staff, families, and the community and by supporting staff to do the same.

 

Demonstrate respect for others by sharing information objectively and non-judgmentally and adjusting verbal and written communication strategies for different audiences.

 

11.   JUDGMENT – the extent to which an employee demonstrates proper judgment and decision-making skills when necessary.

 

Demonstrates the ability to use sound judgment when interacting with staff, parents and

community.

 

Minimizes the agency’s financial and legal risk by assessing exposures to liability, improving internal controls and other program practices, training staff and monitoring their compliance with requirements.

 

Maintains professional boundaries in relations with staff and families by distinguishing between others’ needs and one’s own, guarding against abuse or power and sexual misconduct, and using appropriate language.

 

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS

 

 

QUALIFICATIONS

 

Education/Certification

Bachelor’s Degree in Early Childhood Education, Human Development, and Psychology.

 

Master’s Degree in Early Childhood Education, Human Development, Psychology

 

Required Knowledge:

Knowledge of Microsoft Office

Knowledge of curriculum development

Knowledge of evaluating classrooms

Knowledge of training techniques

Knowledge of lesson planning, assessments

Awareness of and sensitivity to diverse, ethnic and cultural issues

 

Experience Required:

BA/BS degree - five years experience in an early childhood setting

Master degree – two years working in an early childhood setting

 

 

Skills/Abilities:

Able to train in a group setting

Work with diverse groups

Excellent written and verbal skills

 

 

PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES AND REQUIREMENTS OF THIS POSITION

 

Finger dexterity:

Using primarily just the fingers to make small movement such as using computer keyboard, picking up small objects.

 

Talking:

Able to convey detailed information instruction or ideas, accurately, loudly or quickly.

 

Average hearing:

Able to hear average or normal conversation and receive ordinary information.

 

Repetitive motions:

Movements frequently and regularly required using wrist, hands, and fingers.

 

Average visual abilities:

Movements frequently and regularly required.

 

Physical strength:

Sedentary work, sitting most of the time, some walking, able to lift up to 40 lbs: able to kneel.

 

 

WORKING CONDITIONS – No hazardous or significantly unpleasant conditions

 

 

MENTAL ACTIVITIES AND REQUIREMENTS OF THIS POSITION

Reasoning ability:

Ability to apply common sense understanding to carry out instructions in written, oral or diagram form.

Ability to deal with problems and provide solutions.

Ability to analyze.

Mathematics ability:

Ability to add, subtracts, multiply and divide.

Language ability:

Ability to read and interpret documents such as personnel policies, procedures manuals.

Ability to write routine reports and correspondence.

Ability to speak before groups or employees

 

INTENT AND FUNCTION OF JOB DESCRIPTIONS

 

 

 Job descriptions assist organizations in ensuring that the hiring process is fairly administered and that qualified employees are selected.  They are also essential to an effective appraisal system and related promotion, transfer, layoff, and termination decisions.  Well constructed job descriptions are an integral part of any effective compensation system.

 

All descriptions have been reviewed to ensure that only essential functions and basic duties have been included.  Peripheral tasks, only incidentally related to each position, have been excluded.  Requirements, skills and abilities included have been determined to be the minimal standards required to successfully perform the positions.  In no instance, however, should the duties, responsibilities, and requirements delineated to be interpreted as all inclusive.  Additional functions and requirements may be assigned by supervisors as deemed appropriate.

 

In accordance with the Americans with disabilities Act, it is possible that requirements may be modified to reasonably accommodate disabled individuals.  However, no accommodations will be made which may use serious health or safety risks to the employee or others or which impose undue hardships on the organization.

 

Job descriptions are not intended as and do not create employment contracts.  The organization maintains its status as an at-will employer:  Employees can be terminated for any reason not prohibited by law.

 

HEAD START of Greater Dallas, Inc

 

EDUCATION SPECIALIST

POSITION DESCRIPTION

 

POSITION TITLE:  Education Specialist                               CLASSIFICATION: Exempt

DEPARTMENT:                                                                                         APPROVED BY:

 

REPORTING RELATIONSHIPS

 

Position reports to: Site Manager

Positions supervised:

 

POSITION PURPOSE:

Establish and maintain an organizational structure that supports the accomplishments of the program objectives.

 

 

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS AND BASIC DUTIES

 

1.      QUALITY – the extent to which an employee’s work is accurate, thorough and neat.

 

The Education Specialist will be responsible for developmental screening and on-going assessment process; mentor/coaching and teacher training; evaluating classroom environments; facilitating parent interactions;  implementation of continuity of care;  assisting teachers with children with challenges and children transitioning from the program;  integration of Performance Standards for the education content area; and promoting advocacy between Head Start and other support programs.

                    

Provides ongoing training on completion of lesson plans, Assessment, Portfolios, Home Visits, Parent Conferences, Transition Folders, Field Trip Forms, other forms/educational requirements.  Training should occur monthly and documented via database.

 

Trains New Teachers on the agency’s guidelines for implementation of continuity of care and ensures that the outlined procedures are followed, training must be documented.

 

Assist Teachers in preparation and completion of the requirements for CDA/CDA renewal or continuing education upon request.  Must be reviewed annually with documentation of teacher status.

 

Participates in the design and implementation of Teacher in-service training based on classroom observations.  Participates in one in-service per year.

 

Conducts classroom observations using various tools (ECERS, CLASS, Database)  as appropriate; quarterly or as needed in each assigned center via database.  Reports are entered into database within seven days of completion.

 

Provides on going mentoring and coaching for teachers at assigned centers a minimum of 1 hour per week, per classroom modeling effective teaching behavior and must be documented.

 

Helps staff advance program quality by supporting them in linking current research, resources, and program data to their practice and by discussing program quality issues and ways to advance practice.              

 

Monitors and checks children’s Portfolios for content and accuracy and assisting teachers as necessary and appropriate.

 

Advocates for resources to improve program quality by offering suggestions and providing information about needed resources during the program’s planning and budget development process.

 

Advances excellence and progress in the field by advocating for high-quality child and family services at the program, community, state, and/or federal levels.

 

Maintains effective and positive collaborations with Site Manager to ensure quality of the classroom and teacher performance.

 

2.      PRODUCTIVITY - the extent to which an employee produces a significant volume of work  efficiently in a specified period of time.

 

Ensures the administering of the developmental screening of all children enrolled within 45 days of entry into the program.

 

Maintains appropriate documentation of training provided to the education staff on and off site and ensures that each staff member records and maintains required documentation for licensing and Head Start purposes.

 

Approves the selection of appropriate educational materials to be used in the classrooms and review as needed.

 

Maintains appropriate documentation of training provided to the education staff on and off site and ensures that each staff member records and maintains required documentation for licensing and Head Start purposes.

 

Ensures teaching staff adheres to all timelines set forth by the Education Content area.

 

Improves efficiency and effectiveness by using technology to enhance and/or create systems to share and track information about service delivery.

 

3.      JOB KNOWLEDGE- the extent to which an employee possesses the practical/technical knowledge required on the job.

 

Provides ongoing training for teachers and other Support Staff at assigned centers with a minimum of five hours per month (e.g. individual, large or small groups) and submit report to the Site Manager.

 

Assist twice per year in determining the needs of teaching staff for agency wide training conferences and sessions.

 

Assists in the training process through speaking, preparing handouts, organizing training manuals, at least once per year.

 

Provides information to families and team members regarding child and family centered agencies.

 

Collaborates with outside sources concerning appropriate educational strategies and works to bring resources into centers.  Reviews annually.

 

The Education Specialist will make recommendations to Site Manager to execute plans and policies by developing procedures, protocols, and schedules that ensure their full implementation.

 

Builds an understanding of the program by communicating its philosophy, mission, and services to staff, families, and the community and by supporting staff to do the same.

 

4.      RELIABILITY- the extent to which an employee can be relied upon regarding task completion and follow-up.

 

Submits a monthly time schedule for the completion of weekly goals and accomplishments per assigned center and copies submitted to Site Manager each month.

 

Reviews records of all children in assigned centers quarterly to ensure they are current.  Files all Home Visits, Parent Conference forms, and screening results in the children’s permanent file.

 

Maintains database control sheet indicating services completed by the Education Content area.  Updates must occur monthly.

 

The Education Specialist is part of the Center’s team of coverage in the absence of the Site Manager; assignments are made by the Site Manager in accordance with the Minimum Standards.

 

5.      ATTENDANCE- the extent to which an employee is punctual, observes prescribed work break/meal periods and has an acceptable overall attendance record.

 

Is accountable for any time away from the center during scheduled work hours, i.e. home visits, community meetings and conferences.

 

Performs other duties as assigned.

  

6.      INDEPENDENCE – the extent to which an employee performs work with little or no supervision.

 

7.      CREATIVITY – the extent to which an employee possesses ideas, finds new and better ways of doing things.

 

Staying within the guidelines suggested in the Education Specialists Handbook uses knowledge and experience to create an environment that will allow teachers and other staff the opportunity to be part of a team.

 

Has the ability to use resources and provide training and guidance creatively.

 

Represents the community’s cultural and linguistic diversity throughout the program by ensuring that staff, committees, practices, materials, and activities reflect this diversiy.

 

8.      INITIATIVE – the extent to which an employee seeks out new assignments and assumes

    additional duties when necessary.

 

Maintains annual membership of the Head Start Association, National Association for the Education of Young Children or other organizations involved in the education of young children and their families.

 

Furthers professional growth by seeking feedback, reflecting on and assessing own practice, and taking advantage of opportunities to improve skills and knowledge.

 

Maintains 60 hours of training related to Early Childhood Development or other job related skills (training conducted is included).

 

Promotes a collaborative, productive working environment by following established communication protocols, clearly articulating expectations, outcomes, and timelines, and using conflict resolution and negotiation skills when needed.

 

9.      ADHERENCE TO POLICY – the extent to which an employee follows safety and conduct rules, other regulations and adheres to all policies.

 

Supports staff retention by creating an environment that fosters equity and provides opportunities for professional growth. 

 

Advances staff performance by meeting regularly with individual staff to provide performance feedback based on expectations contained in job descriptions, program plans and monitor progress.

 

Supports staff retention by creating an environment that fosters equity and provides opportunities for professional growth.

 

Ensures program’s adherence to applicable federal, state, local, and program standards, policies, and/or procedures by keeping abreast of these requirements and by promoting staff’s understanding and implementation of them.

 

10.   INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS – the extent to which an employee is willing and demonstrates the ability to cooperate, work, and communicate with coworkers, supervisors, customers, vendors, and subordinates.

 

Builds an understanding of the program by communicating its philosophy, mission, and services to staff, families, and the community and by supporting staff to do the same.

 

Demonstrates respect for others by sharing information objectively and non-judgmentally and adjusting verbal and written communication strategies for different audiences.

 

Daily assist other team members that need help in meeting the needs of children and families.

 

11.   JUDGMENT - the extent to which an employee demonstrates proper judgment and decision-making skills when necessary.

 

Demonstrates the ability to use sound judgment when interacting with staff, parents and community.

 

Minimizes the agency’s financial and legal risk by assessing exposures to liability, improving internal controls and other program practices, training staff and monitoring their compliance with requirements.

 

Maintains professional boundaries in relations with staff and families by distinguishing between others’ needs and one’s own, guarding against abuse or power and sexual misconduct, and using appropriate language.

 

 

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS

 

 

QUALIFICATIONS

 

Education/Certification:

Bachelors’ degree in Child Development or Early Childhood Education or Psychology or Family and Human Development.

 

Required Knowledge:

Knowledge of Microsoft Office

Knowledge of curriculum planning

Knowledge of evaluating classrooms

Knowledge of training staff

Knowledge of lesson planning

Knowledge of administering assessments

Awareness of and sensitivity to diverse, ethnic and cultural issues.

 

Experience Required:

Two years of teaching experience in an early childhood setting.

 

Skills/Abilities:

Basic to intermediate computer skills.

 

Able to attend occasional evening or weekend meeting or activities.

 

Ability to communicate effectively with parents and staff.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES AND REQUIREMENTS OF THIS POSITION

 

Finger dexterity:

Using  primarily just the fingers to make small movement such as using computer keyboard, picking up small objects.

 

 

 

Talking:

Able to convey detailed is important information instruction or ideas, accurately, loudly or quickly.

 

Average hearing:

Able to hear average or normal conversation and receive ordinary information.

 

Repetitive motions:

Movements frequently and regularly required using the wrist, hands, and fingers.

 

Average visual abilities:

Movements frequently and regularly required

 

Physical strength:

Sedentary work, sitting most of the time, some walking, able to lift up to

______________________________________________________________________________

 

WORKING CONDITIONS:  No hazardous or significantly unpleasant conditions.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

MENTAL ACTIVITIES AND REQUIREMENTS OF THIS POSITION

 

Reasoning ability:

Ability to apply common sense  understanding to carry out instructions in written, oral, or diagram form. 

 

Ability to deal with problems and provide solutions.

 

Ability to analysis.

 

Mathematics ability:

Ability to add, subtract, multiply and divide.

 

Language ability:

Ability to read and interpret documents such as personnel policies, procedures manuals.

 

Ability to write routine reports and correspondence.

 

 Ability to speak before groups or employees.

 

 

INTENT AND FUNCTION OF JOB DESCRIPTIONS

 

Job descriptions assist organizations in ensuring that the hiring process is fairly administered and that qualified employees are selected.  They are also essential to an effective appraisal system and related promotion, transfer, layoff, and termination decisions.  Well constructed job descriptions are an integral part of any effective compensation system.

 

All descriptions have been reviewed to ensure that only essential functions and basic duties have been included.  Peripheral tasks, only incidentally related to each position, have been excluded.  Requirements, skills and abilities included have been determined to be the minimal standards required to successfully perform the positions.  In no instance, however, should the duties, responsibilities, and requirements delineated to be interpreted as all inclusive.  Additional functions and requirements may be assigned by supervisors as deemed appropriate.

 

In accordance with the Americans with disabilities Act, it is possible that requirements may be modified to reasonably accommodate disabled individuals.  However, no accommodations will be made which may use serious health or safety risks to the employee or others or which impose undue hardships on the organization.

 

Job descriptions are not intended as and do not create employment contracts.  The organization maintains its status as an at-will employer:  Employees can be terminated for any reason not prohibited by law.

 

 

 

           TEACHER II

            POSITION DESCRIPTION

 

POSITION TITLE: Teacher II                                    CLASSIFICATION: Non-Exempt             

______________________________________________________________________________________

REPORTING RELATIONSHIPS

 

Position reports to: Site Manager

Positions supervised: N/A

_______________________________________________________________________________________

POSITION PURPOSE:

Works to enrich children with a learning environment and varied experiences appropriate to the age, stage of development and cultural backgrounds, which will help them develop socially, intellectually, physically and emotionally. This position is responsible for the over all function and implementation of classroom activities.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

 

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS AND BASIC DUTIES

 

1.      QUALITY—the extent to which an employee’s work is accurate, thorough and neat.

 

Working with parents and volunteers to improve their own parenting skills; and working with other staff members to encourage each child’s overall growth and development. The Teacher II has the overall responsibility of ensuring a well organized and safe classroom.

 

Carries out weekly all planned educational activities to meet the cognitive, social, emotional, physical and language development of the children in the classroom.

 

Consistently demonstrates the use of appropriate behavior guidance techniques when interacting with the children (redirection, positive statements and conversation).

 

Supervises daily and interacts positively with the children during large group, small group, independent activities and quiet or active play times.

 

Supervises and shares all mealtime experiences with the children, allowing them to participate in the preparation and cleaning up after each meal (using the family style serving).

 

Provides daily guidance to the children in the development of good hygiene (hand washing, brushing teeth and caring for the children’s personal belongings).

 

Provides daily individual assistance for children with special needs based on their Individual Educational Plan (assistance from Special Services Specialists and Educational Specialist). Reviews weekly.

 

Is knowledgeable of NAEYC accreditation and Minimum Standards of Day Care Licensing (guidelines are followed during daily classroom activities).

 

Is expected to supervise children in the classroom and on the playground at all times.

 

Demonstrates respect for others by sharing information objectively and non-judgmentally and adjusting verbal and written communication strategies for different audiences.

 

Supports children’s overall development by integrating learning experiences related to all domains throughout the curriculum, environment, and day to day activities by accessing opportunities in the community (e.g. field trips, classroom volunteers).

 

Builds children’s vocabulary by regularly introducing new and challenging words, discussing them, and infusing them into ongoing activities.

 

Helps children who are learning English by providing them with the supports (e.g., props, gestures, incorporating basic words in the child’s home language, securing volunteers who speak the child’s language) they need to fully participate in classroom experiences.

 

2.      PRODUCTIVITY—the extent to which an employee produces a significant volume of work efficiently in a specified period of time.

 

The Teacher II is responsible for the overall completion of curriculum implementation, lesson planning, and individualization appropriately for each child in their classrooms  to ensure knowing Teacher III progress.

 

The Teacher II ensures portfolio assessment folders are assembled and maintained each child in the classroom (Parent Comment Sheet, LAP-D/LAP-3(on going assessment), Anecdotal Notes, Home Visit Forms, Parent/Teacher Conference Forms and work samples). Reviews monthly.

 

The Teacher II ensures the Completion of LAP-D Screening (within 45 days of entering the center) performs LAP-3 at the beginning, mid, and end of each school year for each child.  Maintains the LAP-3 on-going assessment throughout the year.

 

The Teacher II ensures the completion and recording of twenty- one anecdotal notes per year, for each child in the classroom. The information should be recorded on the Assessment and Observation Form.   

 

Along with Teacher III completes two home visits and two Parent/Teacher Conferences for each child in the classroom. 

 

The Teacher II ensures completed forms are recorded in the HS database, with a copy to the portfolio.

 

Monitors sign-in/sign-out procedures for children daily. Turns the completed forms in to the Site Manager.

 

Keeps accurate and clear daily attendance records and Meal count via the HS database.

 

Displays dated menus along with updated menu changes weekly.

 

3.      JOB KNOWLEDGE – the extent to which an employee possesses the practical/technical knowledge required on the job.

 

Keeps classroom furniture and supplies clean and organized.  Cleans children’s cots, cubbies and sheets at least once a week (volunteers may be used).

 

Works the assigned schedule in the designated classroom as specified by the Site Manager.

 

 

Keeps all information pertaining to children and families in Head Start or staff members confidential.

 

All communication (written or verbal) with children, parents, volunteers, and other Head Start Staff must be positive and constructive.

 

Employs a culturally competent and flexible approach when working with those from various cultures by acknowledging, accepting, and accommodating differences (e.g. providing information in an understandable format and /or language for those who have limited/no reading skills or who are English language learners).

 

Builds an understanding of the program by communicating its philosophy, mission, and services to staff, families, and the community.

 

Establishes and maintains external professional relationships by participating as a member of community, state, and/or national professional organizations.

 

Uses information about children obtained through home visits, parent-teacher conferences, and other parent-staff interactions by incorporating this data into daily routines and interactions with children.

 

Extends the learning environment beyond the classroom by accessing the community (e.g.  fire station, library, constructions site, etc).

 

4.      RELIABILITY—the extent to which an employee can be relied upon regarding task completion and follow-up.

 

The Teacher II ensures the daily set up and maintenance of the classroom environment and gathers appropriate materials necessary for planned activities at least one day in advance.

 

Plans and coordinates age appropriate field trips and completes all necessary paperwork on time.  At least three field trips per year.

 

Develops weekly lesson plans, and other related material necessary to support the educational program. Turns plans into Education Specialist at a predetermine day and time.

 

Builds children’s awareness of and ability to follow basic health and safety rules by providing opportunities for health and safety learning (e.g., implementing and discussing routines-washing hands, fire drills, crossing streets) and by supervising children at all times and positively redirecting them from potentially harmful activities.

 

 

5.      ATTENDANCEthe extent to which an employee is punctual, observes prescribed work break/meal periods and has an acceptable overall attendance record.

 

Is accountable for any time away from the center during scheduled work hours, i.e. home visits, and conferences.

 

Is responsible for personal check-in/out procedures on a daily basis.

 

Works the assigned schedule in the designated classroom as specified by the Site Manager.

 

6.      INDEPENDENCEthe extent to which an employee performs work with little or no supervision.

 

The ability to make decisions within agency policies and procedures

 

7.      CREATIVITYthe extent to which an employee possesses ideas, finds new and better ways of doing things.

 

Staying within the guidelines suggested in the Teacher Handbook use knowledge and experience to create a classroom arrangement that will allow children the opportunity to work independently, as well as in small and large groups.

 

Has the ability to use Teacher Resources to plan appropriate classroom activities for children on all developmental levels.

 

8.      INITIATIVEthe extent to which an employee seeks out new assignments and assumes additional duties when necessary.

 

Keeps a current CDA or other certifications that are required for maintaining credentials

 

Attends 60 hours of documented training each program year.

 

Maintains current First Aid and CPR Certification (renewal every two years).

 

Maintains membership in Early Childhood Organizations (NAEYC, THSA, and others).

 

9.      ADHERENCE TO POLICYthe extent to which an employee follows safety and conduct rules, other regulations and adheres to all policies.

 

Reports broken equipment to the Site Manager and immediately removes it from the classroom or playground.  Examines equipment daily.

 

Cleans the tables and children’s work areas daily and stores all cleaning chemicals out of children’s reach.

 

Post children’s medication notices, emergency procedures, fire drill procedures, allergy charts and other required information.  Reviews monthly.

 

Signs out all Head Start materials and returns them when finished.  Returns all outdoor equipment to storage areas after use and encourage children to assist.

 

Maintains a healthy physical environment by following health and safety procedures (e.g. following universal precautions, regularly sanitizing equipment, child-proofing environments).

 

10.   INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPSthe extent to which an employee is willing and demonstrates the ability to cooperate, work, and communicate with coworkers, supervisors, customers, vendors, and subordinates.

 

Daily assist other team members (Teachers III and other Staff members) that need help in meeting the needs of the other children and families Head Start serves.

 

11.   JUDGMENTthe extent to which an employee demonstrates proper judgment and decision-making skills when necessary.

 

Demonstrates the ability to use sound judgment when interacting with children, parents and other staff on a daily basis.

 

Maintains professional boundaries in relations with staff and families by distinguishing between others’ needs and one’s own, guarding against abuse or power and sexual misconduct, and using appropriate language.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

 

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS

_______________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

QUALIFICATIONS

 

Education/Certification:

Bachelor’s Degree in Child Development or Early Childhood Education or related field or coursework equivalent to a major relating to early childhood (12 hours) such as psychology, family development,    with experience teaching preschool-age children or an EC-4 Certificate.

 

An Associate’s Degree in Child Development or Early Childhood Education

 

Required Knowledge:

 

Knowledge of developing lesson plans

Knowledge of assessing children and planning individual activities

Knowledge of organizing and maintaining the classroom environment

Knowledge of designing and implementing age-appropriate activities

Knowledge of developing individual portfolio folders

 

Experience Required:

One year working in an early childhood classroom.

 

Skills/Abilities:

 

Work with diverse groups

Good written and verbal skills

Working with parents and families

Agency Computer Proficiency Level-Basic

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_______________________________________________________________________________________

 

PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES AND REQUIREMENTS OF THIS POSITION

 

Finger dexterity:

Using primarily just the fingers to make small movement such as using computer keyboard, picking up small objects.

 

Talking:

Able to convey detailed information instruction or ideas, accurately, loudly or quickly.

 

Average hearing:

Able to hear average or normal conversation and receive ordinary information.

 

Repetitive motions:

Movements frequently and regularly required using wrist, hands, and fingers.

 

Average visual abilities:

Movements frequently and regularly required.

 

Physical strength:

Able to stand, kneel, and run with children on playground.

 

Able to sit comfortably on the floor for at least thirty minutes.

 

Able to lift at least 40lbs.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

 

WORKING CONDITIONS

_______________________________________________________________________________________

 

MENTAL ACTIVITIES AND REQUIREMENTS OF THIS POSITION

 

Reasoning ability:

Ability to apply common sense understanding to carry out instruction in written, oral or diagram form.

 

Ability to deal with problems and provide solutions.

 

Ability to analyze

 

Mathematics ability:

Ability to add, subtracts, multiply and divides.

 

Language ability:

Ability to read and interpret documents such as personnel policies, procedures manuals.

 

Ability to write routine reports and correspondence.

 

Ability to speak before groups or employees.

 

 

 

INTENT AND FUNCTION OF JOB DESCRIPTIONS

 

Job descriptions assist organizations in ensuring that the hiring process is fairly administered and that qualified employees are selected.  They are also essential to an effective appraisal system and related promotion, transfer, layoff, and termination decisions.  Well constructed job descriptions are an integral part of any effective compensation system.

 

All descriptions have been reviewed to ensure that only essential functions and basic duties have been included.  Peripheral tasks, only incidentally related to each position, have been excluded.  Requirements, skills and abilities included have been determined to be the minimal standards required to successfully perform the positions.  In no instance, however, should the duties, responsibilities, and requirements delineated to be interpreted as all inclusive.  Additional functions and requirements may be assigned by supervisors as deemed appropriate.

 

In accordance with the Americans with disabilities Act, it is possible that requirements may be modified to reasonably accommodate disabled individuals.  However, no accommodations will be made which may use serious health or safety risks to the employee or others or which impose undue hardships on the organization.

 

Job descriptions are not intended as and do not create employment contracts.  The organization maintains its status as an at-will employer:  Employees can be terminated for any reason not prohibited by law.

 

 

 

TEACHER III

   POSITION DESCRIPTION

 

POSITION TITLE: Teacher III                                                 CLASSIFICATION: Non-Exempt             

________________________________________________________________________________

REPORTING RELATIONSHIPS

 

Position reports to: Site Manager

Positions supervised: N/A

_______________________________________________________________________________

POSITION PURPOSE:

Works to enrich children with a learning environment and varied experiences appropriate to the age, stage of development and cultural backgrounds, which will help them develop socially, intellectually, physically and emotionally.

_______________________________________________________________________________

 

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS AND BASIC DUTIES

 

1.      QUALITYthe extent to which an employee’s work is accurate, thorough and neat.

 

Working with parents and volunteers to improve their own parenting skills.

 

Working with other staff members to encourage each child’s overall growth and development.

 

Carries out weekly all planned educational activities to meet the cognitive, social, emotional, physical and language development of the children in the classroom.

 

Consistently demonstrates the use of appropriate behavior guidance techniques when interacting with the children (redirection, positive statements and conversation).

 

Supervises daily and interacts positively with the children during large group, small group, independent activities and quiet or active play times.

 

Supervises and shares all mealtime experiences with the children, allowing them to participate in the preparation and cleaning up after each meal (using the family style serving).

 

Provides daily guidance to the children in the development of good hygiene (hand washing, brushing teeth and caring for the children’s personal belongings).

 

Provides daily individual assistance for children with special needs based on their Individual Educational Plan (assistance from Special Services Specialists and Educational Specialist). Reviews weekly.

 

Is knowledgeable of NAEYC accreditation and Minimum Standards of Day Care Licensing (guidelines are followed during daily classroom activities).

 

Is expected to supervise children in the classroom and on the playground at all times.

 

Demonstrates respect for others by sharing information objectively and non-judgmentally and adjusting verbal and written communication strategies for different audiences.

 

Supports children’s overall development by integrating learning experiences related to all domains throughout the curriculum, environment, and day and by accessing opportunities in the community (e.g. field trips, classroom volunteers).

 

Builds children’s vocabulary by regularly introducing new and challenging words, discussing them, and infusing them into ongoing activities.

 

Helps children who are learning English by providing them with the supports (e.g., props, gestures, incorporating basic words in the child’s home language, securing volunteers who speak the child’s language) they need to fully participate in classroom experiences.

 

2.      PRODUCTIVITYthe extent to which an employee produces a significant volume of work efficiently in a specified period of time.

 

Expected to carry out curriculum, lesson planning, and individualization appropriately for each child in their care.

 

Assembles and maintains a portfolio assessment folder for each child in the classroom (Parent Comment Sheet, LAP-D/LAP-3(on-going assessment), Anecdotal Notes, Home Visit Forms, Parent/Teacher Conference Forms and work samples). Reviews monthly.

 

Completes LAP-D Screening (within 45 days of entering the center) performs LAP-3 at the beginning, mid, and end of each school year for each child.  Maintains the LAP-3 on-going assessment throughout the year.

 

Completes 21anecdotal notes per year, per child in assigned classroom and make recordings on the Assessment and Observation Form.

 

Along with co-teacher completes two home visits and two Parent/Teacher Conferences for each child in the classroom.

 

Completed forms are recorded in the HS database, with a copy to the portfolio.

 

Monitors sign-in/sign-out procedures for children daily. Turns the completed forms in to the Site Manager.

 

Keeps accurate and clear daily attendance records and Meal count via the HS database.

 

Displays dated menus along with updated menu changes weekly.

 

Contributes to program’s reports to local, state, and federal officials and funders by providing accurate data.

 

3.      JOB KNOWLEDGEthe extent to which an employee possesses the practical/technical knowledge required on the job

 

Keeps classroom furniture and supplies clean and organized.  Cleans children’s cots, cubbies and sheets at least once a week (volunteers may be used).

 

Keeps all information pertaining to children and families in Head Start or staff members confidential.

 

All communication (written or verbal) with children, parents, volunteers, and other Head Start Staff must be positive and constructive.

 

Employs a culturally competent and flexible approach when working with those from various cultures by acknowledging, accepting, and accommodating differences (e.g. providing information in an understandable format and/or language for those who have limited/no reading skills or who are English language learners).

 

Builds an understanding of the program by communicating its philosophy, mission, and services to staff, families, and the community.

 

Establishes and maintains external professional relationships by participating as a member of community, state, and/or national professional organizations.

 

Uses information about children obtained through home visits, parent-teacher conferences, and other parent-staff interactions by incorporating this data into daily routines and interactions with children.

 

Extends the learning environment beyond the classroom by accessing the community (e.g.  fire station, library, constructions site, etc).

 

4.      RELIABILITYthe extent to which an employee can be relied upon regarding task completion and follow-up.

 

Sets up and maintains the classroom environment and gathers appropriate materials necessary for planned activities at least one day in advance.

 

Plans and coordinates age appropriate field trips and completes all necessary paperwork on time.  At least three field trips per year.

 

Develops weekly lesson plans, and other related material necessary to support the educational program. Turns plans into Education Specialist at a predetermined day and time.

 

Builds children’s awareness of and ability to follow basic health and safety rules by providing opportunities for health and safety learning (e.g., implementing and discussing routines-washing hands, fire drills, crossing streets) and by supervising children at all times and positively redirecting them from potentially harmful activities.

 

 

 

5.      ATTENDANCEthe extent to which an employee is punctual, observes prescribed work break/meal periods and has an acceptable overall attendance record.

 

Is accountable for any time away from the center during scheduled work hours, i.e. home visits, and conferences.

 

Is responsible for personal check-in/out procedures on a daily basis.

 

Works the assigned schedule in the designated classroom as specified by the Site Manager.

 

6.      INDEPENDENCEthe extent to which an employee performs work with little or no supervision.

 

7.      CREATIVITYthe extent to which an employee possesses ideas, finds new and better ways of doing things.

 

Staying within the guidelines suggested in the Teacher Handbook use knowledge and experience to create a classroom arrangement that will allow children the opportunity to work independently, as well as in small and large groups.

 

Has the ability to use Teacher Resources to plan appropriate classroom activities for children on all developmental levels.

 

8.      INITIATIVEthe extent to which an employee seeks out new assignments and assumes additional duties when necessary.

 

Works to achieve CDA certification within the HEAD START prescribed time.

 

Maintains a current CDA certification (renews every three to five years).

 

Attends 60 hours of documented training each program year.

 

Maintains current First Aid and CPR Certification (renewal every two years).

 

Maintains membership in Early Childhood Organizations (NAEYC, THSA, and others).

 

9.      ADHERENCE TO POLICYthe extent to which an employee follows safety and conduct rules, other regulations and adheres to all policies.

 

Reports broken equipment to the Site Manager and immediately removes it from the classroom or playground.  Examines equipment daily.

 

Cleans the tables and children’s work areas daily and stores all cleaning chemicals out of children’s reach.

 

Post children’s medication notices, emergency procedures, fire drill procedures, allergy charts and other required information.  Reviews monthly.

 

Signs out all Head Start materials and returns them when finished.  Returns all outdoor equipment to storage areas after use and encourage

 

Maintains a healthy physical environment by following health and safety procedures (e.g. following universal precautions, regularly sanitizing equipment, child-proofing environments).

 

10.   INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS—the extent to which an employee is willing and demonstrates the ability to cooperate, work, and communicate with coworkers, supervisors, customers, vendors, and subordinates.

 

Daily assist other team members (Teachers II and other Staff members) that need help in meeting the needs of the other children and families Head Start serves.

 

11.   JUDGMENTthe extent to which an employee demonstrates proper judgment and decision-making skills when necessary.

 

Demonstrates the ability to use sound judgment when interacting with children, parents and other staff on a daily basis.

 

Maintains professional boundaries in relations with staff and families by distinguishing between others’ needs and one’s own, guarding against abuse or power and sexual misconduct, and using appropriate language.

______________________________________________________________________________

 

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS

______________________________________________________________________________

 

QUALIFICATIONS

 

Education/Certification:

High School Diploma

Current Child Development Associate (CDA) credential, and

GED

 

Required Knowledge:

Some knowledge of developing lesson plans

Some knowledge of assessing children and planning individual activities

Some knowledge of organizing and maintaining the classroom environment

Some knowledge of designing and implementing age-appropriate activities

Some knowledge of developing individual portfolio folders

 

Experience Required:

3 months experience working in an early childhood classroom.

 

 

 

Skills/Abilities:

Work with diverse groups

Good written and verbal skills

Working with parents and families

Agency Computer Proficiency Level-Basic

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_______________________________________________________________________________

 

PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES AND REQUIREMENTS OF THIS POSITION

 

Finger dexterity:

Using primarily just the fingers to make small movement such as using computer keyboard, picking up small objects.

 

Talking:

Able to convey detailed information instruction or ideas, accurately, loudly or quickly.

 

Average hearing:

Able to hear average or normal conversation and receive ordinary information.

 

Repetitive motions:

Movements frequently and regularly required using wrist, hands, and fingers.

 

Average visual abilities:

Movements frequently and regularly required.

 

Physical strength:

Able to stand, kneel, and run with children on playground.

 

Able to sit comfortably on the floor for at least thirty minutes.

 

Able to lift at least 40lbs.

_______________________________________________________________________________

 

WORKING CONDITIONS

_______________________________________________________________________________

 

MENTAL ACTIVITIES AND REQUIREMENTS OF THIS POSITION

Reasoning ability:


Ability to apply common sense understanding to carry out instruction in written, oral or diagram form.

 

Ability to deal with problems and provide solutions.

 

Ability to analyze

 

 

Mathematics ability:

Ability to add, subtracts, multiply and divides.

 

Language ability:

 

Ability to read and interpret documents such as personnel policies, procedures manuals.

 

Ability to write routine reports and correspondence.

 

Ability to speak before groups or employees.

 

 

INTENT AND FUNCTION OF JOB DESCRIPTIONS

 

Job descriptions assist organizations in ensuring that the hiring process is fairly administered and that qualified employees are selected.  They are also essential to an effective appraisal system and related promotion, transfer, layoff, and termination decisions.  Well constructed job descriptions are an integral part of any effective compensation system.

 

All descriptions have been reviewed to ensure that only essential functions and basic duties have been included.  Peripheral tasks, only incidentally related to each position, have been excluded.  Requirements, skills and abilities included have been determined to be the minimal standards required to successfully perform the positions.  In no instance, however, should the duties, responsibilities, and requirements delineated to be interpreted as all inclusive.  Additional functions and requirements may be assigned by supervisors as deemed appropriate.

 

In accordance with the Americans with disabilities Act, it is possible that requirements may be modified to reasonably accommodate disabled individuals.  However, no accommodations will be made which may use serious health or safety risks to the employee or others or which impose undue hardships on the organization.

 

Job descriptions are not intended as and do not create employment contracts.  The organization maintains its status as an at-will employer:  Employees can be terminated for any reason not prohibited by law.

 

 

 

EDUCATION CONTENT AREA PLAN

 

 

 

PART II

 

CURRICULUM   ELEMENTS

 

THE THEMATIC APPROACH

 

1.  In the early childhood classroom, the thematic approach is a method of organizing learning materials and activities. 

 

2.  This approach supports two key teaching components:  First - information and Second - skill opportunity.  Information encompasses the details about the theme that the teacher shares with the classroom.  A skill opportunity is any activity provided to the children that helps them reach developmental milestones.

 

3.  HEAD START of Greater Dallas, Inc. utilizes the Scholastic BIG DAY for Pre-K as it main curriculum. 

 

4.  The SBDP is a Thematic Based program and is organized into eight thematic units. 

 

5.  Each unit is outlined to include: concepts, objectives, vocabulary, open-ended questions, learning activities, book lists, songs finger plays, poems, parent involvement activities, health/nutrition activities, and mental health activities. 

 

6.  The Scholastic BIG DAY for Pre-K supports the expectations of The Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework and the Texas Pre-Kindergarten Guidelines and specifically aligned with both.

 

  

 

THE SCHOLASTIC BIG DAY for Pre-K

 

1. The Scholastic BIG DAY for Pre-K is the base curriculum for HEAD START of Greater Dallas.
2. Children are able to learn through a holistic approach developed around a central theme.
3. The Scholastic BIG DAY for Pre-K is one of the Texas Education Agency’s approved curriculums and is aligned with the Texas Pre-K Guidelines and The Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework .
4. The Scholastic BIG DAY for Pre-K prepares Pre-Kindergarten children to enter kindergarten with the language, early literacy, mathematics, social/emotional, and cognitive skills necessary for learning and early reading success.  An additional unit is included to address Children and Parent Pedestrian safety.  This unit is used by all classrooms the first weeks of school in August.
5.

The program addresses all nine areas of the Pre- Kindergarten Curriculum Guidelines: Language and Early Literacy, Math, Science, Social Studies, Fine Arts, Health and Safety, Personal and Social Development, Physical Development, and Technology.  Personal and Social Development is addressed integratively, as its own curriculum.

6. The Scholastic BIG DAY for Pre-K supports the expectations of The Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework and the Texas Pre-K Guidelines.
7. HEAD START of Greater Dallas uses a different theme each month of the school year.  The SBDP has eight theme-based Teacher’s Guides with daily lessons for Circle Time, Story time, and the Learning Centers.
8. HEAD START of Greater Dallas continues to use Thematic Guide Units “Pedestrian Safety,” “Health and Summer,” and “Vacation.”  The units Pedestrian Safety address the Transportation Regulation, 1310.  Health, summer and Vacation are used for centers that are open during the summer months.

 

 

THEMATIC UNITS

 

August                                               Ready for School  

                                                            Pedestrian Safety (1st, 2nd and 3rd week)

 

September                                        My Home

 

October                                            Our Community

 

November                                         Awesome Animals

 

December                                         Imagine It, Make It

 

January                                            Growing Up Healthy

 

February                                           Nature All Around Us

 

March                                               Nature All Around Us

 

April                                                  Moving On

 

May                                                   Review Units

 

June                                                  Health, summer

 

July                                                   Vacation

 

 

How to Use the Scholastic BIG DAY for Pre-K

 

Each classroom has a complete curriculum set and instruction on its use.  All new teachers are given a complete overview during the three days of new teacher training.

 

The SBDP has four components:

 

Curriculum Theme Packs – 8 Theme Packs including:

·        Teacher’s Guide

·        Read Alouds

·        Theme Little Books

·        Theme Audiocassettes

BIG Learning Box

·        Clifford Posters

·        Clifford Books

·        Clifford Puppet

·        Songs and Finger plays Book and CDs

·        Healthy Foods

·        Classroom Alphabet Chart

·        Math Mats

·        Science Posters

·        Manipulative Kit

·        Letter Cards

·        Picture Cards

·        Number Cards

·        Magnetic Alphabet Letters

·        Magnetic Alphabet Board

·        Letter Vest and Vest Pocket Letters

·        Big Wall Chart Box

Fiction and Nonfiction Books

·        Technology Center Books, Alphabet Books, Read Aloud Books

·        40 Content Area Big Books

 

 

LEARNING ACCOMPLISHMENT PROFILE THIRD EDITION

(LAP-3 ASSESSMENT) & THE PORTFOLIO

 

1. The LAP-3 Assessment is kept in an individual portfolio for each child.  The Portfolio contains additional anecdotal notes and child-created materials.
2. The Learning Accomplishment Profile Third Edition (LAP-3) is an ongoing documentation of the child's observed abilities and is used continuously to evaluate the child's progress.  Lesson Plans and anecdotal notes are developed according to the skill or concepts yet to be achieved.
3. Parents/Guardians have access to their child's portfolio.  Confidentiality must be maintained.
4. The LAP-3 is to be completed by an informal assessment process in the classroom and through daily observations of the child.
5. The LAP-3 addresses 7 areas of development:  Gross & Fine Motor, Pre-Writing, Cognitive, Language, and Self-Help & Personal/Social.

 

 

THE PORTFOLIO

 

1. Each child has an individual portfolio, which is kept in the classroom.  The teacher assigns a number for the child, listed on the front of the portfolio.  This number is also used for lesson planning.
2.

The anecdotal notes consist of written narratives of the child's observed daily activities; what the child does and says (physical attributes and verbal expressions).  The parent/guardian also has the opportunity to make any notations of the child's development.

3.

Samples of the child's work are kept on a continuous basis (at least once a month).  These samples are kept in the portfolio for the duration of the program year.  At the end of the year the child’s work should be given to the parent.  For children going to Kindergarten this is done after the teacher has selected samples that will be included in the transition folder (see Transition Folder).

4. The portfolio is kept in the classroom, taken on home visits, and the papers are (filed in the child’s blue Family File at the close of the school year) maintained in the child’s Portfolio while the child is in HEAD START.

 

Developmental Screening

 

LEARNING ACCOMPLISHMENT PROFILE NORMED SCREENS

(LAP-D SCREENS)

 

 

1. LAP-D is an individually administered developmental screening designed to screen young children ages 3.0 through 5.0.
2. All new children are screened within the first 45 days of the child’s entry of the program by the classroom teacher.  This includes the children coming from the Early Head Start Programs.
3. The results of the screenings are used by the teacher to begin individual planning for each child as well as identify children that may need a more in depth assessment to address special needs.
4 It is the responsibility of the Teacher, Education Specialist, Special Services Specialists and the Site Manager to ensure screenings are completed, and reviewed (and filed in the child’s permanent folder) and entered in the Database.
5. The Education Specialists and the Special Service Specialists will be responsible for the scoring of the DECA instrument.
6. The Devereux Early Childhood Assessment (DECA) is a major component of the screening process.  The DECA is a tool used to focus on three protective factors-attachment, self-control, and initiative-which are closely related to social and emotional development.  The DECA also looks at the child’s use of specific challenging behaviors.  The teacher and a family member complete a DECA Record Form to review the child’s use of skills and behaviors related to resilience.  DECA results are summarized in individual and classroom profiles that are used to plan strategies to encourage children’s social and emotional strengths.
7. The results of the screening are reviewed with the parents during the Parent Conference or home visit.

 

 

LEARNING ACCOMPLISHMENT PROFILE GUIDELINES

Input LAP-3

Mobile Scoring Assistant

 

1. Each classroom has a Mobil Scoring Assistant with the LAP-3 assessment information installed.  Both teachers in the classroom are responsible for the care and use of the LAP-3 Hand Held Computer.
2. Please refer to Insert “Mobile Scoring Assistant Flow Chart”

 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATIONAL PRINCIPLES

 

APPROPRIATE PRACTICES

 

1.

Head Start requires that teachers use developmentally appropriate practices in the classroom at all times.

2. According to the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) guidelines, developmental          appropriateness has two parts: 
  A.

First, that activities and expectations in the classroom are age appropriate. This means that the learning  environment and learning experiences are planned particularly for an age group.  For Head Start and Early Head Start the age group includes children from zero to five years of age;

  B. Second, teachers must recognize that each child is a unique person and that learning should incorporate experiences which are individually appropriate, not only matching a child's abilities but challenging them as well.
3.

Certain atmosphere should be observed in the classroom.

  A. For example, the learning environment in a Head Start classroom should be colorful and  (engage young children's interest.)
  B. Bulletin boards, pictures, and artwork should be placed at children's eye level.
  C. Activities and experiences must be planned in a way that encourages children to participate.
  D. Children this age should be given hands-on direct experiences with a variety of materials.
  E. Children remember a surprising amount of what is touched, explored, and experienced.
4.

Because children develop differently and at different stages, careful observation, evaluation, and planning must be done to meet individual needs. 

5. In keeping activities appropriate, be sure that activities are relevant to the children's interest.
6. Children have time to experiment with what they are learning or working on.
7. Children are encouraged to learn from their own self-directed problem solving.
8.

Children are given choices in joining an activity.

    

 

MULTICULTURAL PRINCIPLES

 

1. Every individual is rooted in culture.
2. The cultural groups represented in the communities and families of each Head Start program the primary sources for culturally relevant programming.
3. Culturally relevant and diverse programming requires learning accurate information about the culture of different groups and discarding stereotypes.
4. Addressing cultural relevance in making curriculum choices is a necessary, developmentally appropriate practice.
5. Every individual has the right to maintain his or her own identity while acquiring the skills required functioning in our diverse society.
6. Effective programs for children with limited English speaking ability require continued development of the primary language while the acquisition of English is facilitated.
7. Culturally relevant programming requires staff that reflects the community and families served.
8. Multicultural programming for children enables children to develop an awareness of, respect for,and appreciation of individual cultural differences.  It is beneficial to all children.
9. Culturally relevant and diverse programming examines and challenges institutional and   personal biases.
10. Culturally relevant and diverse programming and practices are incorporated in all content areas and services.

       

 

THE VALUE OF PLAY

 

1. Play serves many purposes for the young child.
2. Children learn through play.
3. Play is an outlet of communication where the toys act as the child's words and play becomes the child's language.
4. Below are some ways in which children benefit from play:
  A. Play is the way the child explores and orients himself to the actual world of space and time, of  things, animals, structures and people
  B. Play is a self-chosen activity.
  C. Through play repetition, children develop their skills.
  D. As they become more competent, they begin to seek new and more advanced experiences.
  E. Play serves as a means of self-assertion through which a child can declare his needs.
5.

Play helps each child to develop social relationships and skills.

  A. He or she learns to use play materials and equipment;
  B. Share and cooperate;
  C. Lead and to follow;
  D. Request information;
  E. Gain confidence and a positive self-image.
  F. Communicate and become aware of differences and similarities among his or her peers.

   

 

BEHAVIORAL GUIDANCE

 

1. Classroom rules and limits are established early in the year.
2. Adult authority is established without threat to the children, but more related to trust.
3. The ultimate goal is to give children an opportunity to develop into self-controlled, self-disciplined individuals.
4. The classroom management techniques must be geared toward the age level and individuality of each child.
5. The teachers plan ahead by providing a physical environment, which will prevent problems before they occur.
6. This planning includes room arrangements, adequate materials, and developmentally appropriate activities.
7. Teachers are also encouraged to reinforce appropriate behaviors such as by using touching, eye contact, smiling, and positive statements to guide (the) children.
8. Positive redirection is used to distract a child from an inappropriate behavior, thus giving the child an alternative action.
9. "I" statements are used to verbalize a redirection and to avoid a defensive reaction.
10. Time Out is used to defuse a situation in which the child has harmed another child, himself, a teacher, or equipment.
11. Time out is utilized after the child has had a chance to correct the behavior.
12. When the child needs to be isolated from the situation he is moved away but remains in full view of the teacher.
13. This gives the child an opportunity to become calm and deal with his/her thoughts and feelings in a safe manner.
14. The time allotted is comparable to the child's age not exceeding five minutes.
15. Once the allotted time has passed, the child has the opportunity to work through the situation with teacher assistance. 
16. The time allotted is comparable to the age not exceeding five minutes.
17.

If extreme behaviors persist, they should be referred to Special Services.

 

 

(See Appendix D...to review HEAD START of Greater Dallas, Inc.'s Child Discipline Policy.  Page one of the policy statement should be posted in the classroom.

 

 

 

THE TEACHING TEAM

 

1. There is (a Site Manager, responsible for the overall center operation) an Education Specialist in each center to address the educational needs of the teachers. 
2. An Education Coordinator is assigned to each Center and is available to parents, teachers, Education Specialist, or other Support staff as needed.
3. In (the remaining classes) each classroom there is a Teacher II and Teacher III.
4. The Teacher II and III lead the classroom in a team approach.
5. Classrooms usually have fifteen to twenty children.
6.  A ratio of no more than ten children to every one adult is maintained through the teaching staff, parents, and substitutes.
7. Whenever possible parents and other volunteers are used to lower the ratios. 
8. This staff population allows for the needs of children who require individual and small group attention to be met, and also for the needs of parents to be involved. 
9. The efforts of both parents and volunteers are counted on in meeting the twenty-percent in-kind that local communities must furnish in order for the program to qualify for federal funds.
10. Thus, this arrangement is of benefit to children, parents, teachers, and community.

 

 

Inclusion for Special Needs Children

 

Physical Arrangement Adaptations for Special Needs Children:

 

1. If physically handicapped children are to be enrolled, remove physical barriers for wheelchair access, and provide wider paths for movement through the room.
2. For visually impaired children, reduce the amount of visual information in each area.  Remove patterned background on displays.  Keep materials in the same place in each area.
3. Hearing-impaired children are helped by more visual stimulation and reduced auditory distraction.  Carpet on shelves, mats or pads on work areas will decrease noise level.

 

   

Center Adaptations for Special Needs Children:

 

1. Playground:  the playground is one of the most natural places to include children with special needs.  Make minor adjustments and special needs children can participate in planned activities.  For example, a child in a wheelchair can hit a ball off a tee with a lightweight bat and a partner can run the bases in his place.
2. Sand and Water:  this is a favorite area for special needs children and does not need a lot of adaptation.  Use large utensils that are easy to grasp.  Match the difficulty of the activity to the child’s level of functioning.
3. Cooking/Nutrition:  every child can participate in cooking activities through equal access.  Cooking trays can be affixed to wheelchairs and adaptive utensils can be bought or made.  Sensory-impaired children can be paired with other children who can “read” or demonstrate desired behaviors.
4. Table Games:  Special needs children often display delays, omissions or regression in motor skills.  Provide materials and activities to enhance their level of attainment.  Give children time to explore and practice.  Reduce the task to small steps.  Assist only when necessary.  Allow for failure, multiple attempts and lots of repetition.  B constantly aware of safety.
5. Library:  few adaptations needed, but be sensitive to individual differences and find books that include all interest levels as well as stories about children with special needs.
6. Woodworking:  encourage special needs children to accomplish as many large and small motor activities as they can.  Modify the workbench to allow wheelchair access.
7. Dramatic Play:  this center is easily adapted for special needs children.  Be sure traffic patterns are wide and clear.  Us props that can be easily identified through touch and keep things in the same place to make them easy to find.  Use familiar and realistic props to help all children with special needs express themselves through play.
8. Music:  the magic of music allows all children to learn and have fun with rhythm, movement, sounds and music games.  The activities can be therapeutic, promote a positive self-concept and be relaxing and fun.
9. Art:  focus on the process rather than the product.  Do not emphasize realistic drawings, Non-loop scissors and knobbed crayons are available for children with motor impairments.  Markers require less pressure to produce results.  Substitute texture and tactile activities (collages, modeling); use white figures on a black background.  Outlining the borders of the paper in black marker may aid a child with visual perception difficulties.  Gluing yarn on paper may substitute for drawing.  Art activities can be therapeutic for children with emotional problems.
10. Blocks:  Many handicapped children are able to play on the floor.  Visually impaired children may require accessories that have conspicuous textures and sounds; learning disabled and mentally retarded children may need more time for hands on activities.

 

  

Ask parents for suggestions while making it clear that you are determined to insure every child’s participation

 

 

 

End of Year Celebrations

 

There is value in celebrating the completion of preschool.  The event can be valuable it is seen from the child’s viewpoint and activities are planned accordingly.  Here are some ways to make the end of preschool a meaningful experience for all children.

 

1.

Have a children’s fair to display a sampling of the children’s artwork done through the year with each piece with each piece of art, attach a description dictated by the child or a photograph of the child working on the to emphasize that the process is more important than the product.  Have the children engage in informal activities that indicate the skill and concepts that they have acquired throughout the year, such as singing songs, telling stories, and using equipment to demonstrate gross motor skills.  Allow the children to prepare refreshments and serve their families thereby displaying their social skills as hosts and hostesses.

2.

Publish books of the children’s original drawings, poems and sayings.  Have children present these books to their families.

3.

Take pictures of each child at various times throughout the year and organize the pictures into a book.  The Book could be titled A Day in Preschool and presented by the children to their families.

4. Have a family picnic with all the families in the class.  Have games, storytelling and sing-a-longs.
5.

Invite Kindergarten teachers from the schools the children will be attending.  Make it a positive meeting between the teachers and the children.

6.

Prepare a tape recording for each child that would include the child’s participation in various activities throughout the year.  Include a personal message from the caregiver to the children.

 

 

GRADUATION

 

The end of preschool can certainly be seen as a celebration – a celebration of the child’s growth and development, a celebration of the skills and concepts the child has learned for success in formal schooling.  The end of preschool is the beginning of the journey toward an academic degree or diploma.  It is a step in the right direction.

 

Webster’s Dictionary defines graduation as “the award or acceptance of an academic degree or diploma.”  A graduate is defined as the “holder of an academic degree or diploma.”  By graduating from preschool, do children receive academic degrees or diplomas; of course not.  By definition, then preschool graduations are meaningless.

 

Consider preschool graduation from a developmental viewpoint.  Extensive research shows that children’s developmental needs are best met through a child-directed, play oriented approach.

 

The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), a strong proponent of developmentally appropriate programs, defines developmental appropriateness as having two dimensions:  age and individuality.  Programs need to be geared to children’s ages and developmental levels as well as to individual differences.

 

What makes preschool graduations developmentally inappropriate?

 

1. Too much time spent practicing.  Hours of practice rob children of valuable time to engage in a variety of more appropriate activities.
2. Too much emphasis placed on a “perfect product.”  The process rather that the product, is what is important for children.
3. Too much time waiting with nothing to do.  Having to wait for long periods leads to frustration and anti-social behavior.  This behavior is sometimes interpreted by the caregivers as “children misbehaving” when children simply need to have their needs for rest and play met.
4. Too much importance placed on the meaning of “graduation.”  The concept of graduation has little meaning, and therefore, little importance for children.  Children need hands-on activities that are real and relevant to their experiences.
5. Too many expectations for adult-like behavior.  Waiting for long periods, being still, and being quiet is expecting too much of a child who needs to move around and be actively involved.
6. Too much emphasis placed on passive participation.  Children are expected to do as they are told, keep still and stay in line.  With such a lack of active participation, little learning is taking place.  Whatever learning is taking place id probably negative.
7. Too great an opportunity for embarrassment and humiliation for children.  Adults often refer to children as “cute” when they are standing in front of a large audience, although children may actually be in tears, frighten or shy.

     

  

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

 

 

BASIC CLASSROOM DAILY SCHEDULE

 

 

7:00 a.m.  -  8:30 a.m.               Arrival; Morning Activities, Read Aloud

 

8:30 a.m.  -  9:00 a.m.               Breakfast

 

9:00 a.m.  -  9:15 a.m.               Music/Movement/Transition

 

9:15 a.m.  – 9:30 a.m.               Big Experiences

 

9:30 a.m.  -  10:00 a.m.    Outside/Active Play

 

10:00 a.m. - 10:10 a.m.     Cool Down/Transition

 

10:10 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.            Big Experiences  

 

11:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.            Individualization Group  

 

11:45 a.m. - 12:00 a.m.            Big Experiences

 

12:00 p.m. – 12:30 p.m.           Lunch

 

12:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.     Dental Hygiene

 

12:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.             Relaxation/Nap

 

3:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.                Snack

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.               Outside  

 

4:10 p.m. -4:30 p.m.                 Cool Down

 

4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.               Center Activities 

 

 

This is a sample schedule.  Each teacher must adjust this schedule to fit the needs of the children and center.

 

 

 

ROOM ARRANGEMENT

 

1. Make sure that traffic patterns are clearly defined and that traffic flows freely and limits running.
2. Separate noisy or active areas from quiet areas.
3. Store materials and equipment near the center in which they will be used and allow children to have access to use all materials.
4. Learning centers should be clearly labeled and defined by low shelves or partitions.
5. Materials within a center should be labeled with words and pictures on the shelves to help the children identify where items belong and to associate items with printed words.
6. Place centers, which require light near windows.
7. Messy activities, such as water play and art, should be placed in uncarpeted areas and near a sink when possible.
8. Centers should be arranged so as to allow the teachers to see all the children from any point in the classroom.
9. Teacher materials should be stored separately out of the room and off children's shelves.

     

 

CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT CHECKLIST

  

LABELING

 

Preschool age children quickly learn to identify objects in their environment through the establishment of mental images to represent these objects.  At this level, the word “dog:” evokes the image of a dog in the child’s mind.  The next level is the complex association of words with objects.  The difficulty here is that abstract symbols (letters) are used to represent objects to which they have no relation.  By labeling objects in a young child’s every day environment, they begin to associate these symbol groups as words that represent specific objects or areas.  This object-to-word association develops language skills, and also reading.

 

To that end, there are specific objects in the Head Start classroom that must labeled.  The labeling is to represent the languages represented in your particular center.  If you have 1 or more children in your classroom whose primary language is not English, objects must be labeled in languages represented.  The following objects in your classroom are to be labeled:

              

               One Chair

               One Table

               One Door

               One Window

               One Shelf

               Computer

               Clock

               Refrigerator, stove, sink, bed, table, chair, cupboard in Dramatic Play

               Any other object based on teacher discretion.

 

In centers where materials are frequently exchanged labels should be on the containers for recognition.  In all centers there should be consistent items, which are labeled on the shelf for ease of, clean up.  All items have a place to be returned to, teaching order.

 

Please note that all learning centers in the classrooms are also to be labeled in this manner.  Center labeling is to be done using two inch lettering (purchased labels can be used).  Bulletin Boards or special displays in the classroom should be done with tow inch lettering also.  White or manila sentence strips are necessary for teacher made labels.  Shelves and containers within the centers are to be labeled with one-inch letters and /or pictures.  Paper outlines of the objects on the shelves can also be used.  Proper grammar, first letter is to be capitalized, all other lowercase.  The exception is for words in Spanish, which are to be written in all lowercase letters.

 

For object labeling:           Table, mesa         Clock, reloj

 

For center labeling:           Science                Music

                                             ciencia                 musica

 

 

LEARNING CENTERS

 

1. The classroom is divided into "interest centers" or "learning centers".
2. These divisions encourage specific kinds of learning within each activity center.
3. The kinds and number of learning centers will vary slightly according to the size of the room and the number, ages, and interests of the children.
4. The weekly themes as well as culturally relevant items are present throughout the learning centers.    Learning centers include:


  Learning Centers


      
Library Center:

  A. The Library Center is a quiet area.
  B. It should be located as far away from the noisy areas of the classroom as possible.
  C. The area should be blocked off from disturbances by low shelves or partitions.
  D. A small corner of the room with pillows, a beanbag, or comfortable chair will make this area inviting.
  E. Additionally this area should have a shelf to display books available to the children.
  F. Remember to stand books upright with the covers showing so that the children will be drawn to look through them.
  G. Torn books or books without covers should be removed and replaced.
  H. The books present in this area should be changed periodically.
  I. A variety of real life stories as well as fantasy books should be present.
  J. Some books available should also relate to the current theme.

 

 

Math Center: 

  A. This center houses puzzles, beads, and pegboards, counting games and other manipulative that may include teacher-made activities.
  B. There should be a shelf for storing the materials and a small table and chairs for the children to use while working in this area.

  

Science Center:

  A. The Science Center should be a busy area full of things for the children to examine, manipulate, and explore.
  B. Space to display leaves, animals, and rock collections, sound cans and other scientific items such as scales and rulers.
  C. Plants, aquariums, and items that float and sink are all part of this learning center.
  D. It should be located near any available source of light, water, and electricity.

   

Art Center: 

  A. The Art Center should be located in an uncarpeted area, near a sink if possible, to provide for easy clean up.
  B. Shelves are needed to house paints, clay, brushes, paper, and the many materials needed for arts.
  C. Creativity is encouraged.  Items are stored so that children may select the materials they want to work with.

 

Block Center:

  A. This center should be located away from the flow of traffic from other areas to prevent disturbances.
  B. There should be plenty of shelves to provide adequate storage of the blocks and props.
  C. Since block play is usually noisy, this center should be located as far away as possible from the Library Center.
  D. Carpeting is needed in this area to help absorb the noise.

 

Dramatic Play Center:

A. Since the Dramatic Play Center involves role-playing; it should be located in the area of the room assigned to noisy activities.
B. The center should contain equipment and materials, which will encourage the children to try out many roles.
C. Clothing, including a variety:
  1. Hats and uniforms
  2. child-sized kitchens
  3. household furnishings to motivate children to recreate familiar situations.
D.

Role-playing can be expanded by changing the props in this center to suggest different kinds of play throughout the year.

E.

Make a few changes, this center can become:

  1. A doctor's office
  2. Beauty shop
  3. Grocery store
  4. Restaurant

     

Computer Center:

A. The Computer Center contains an actual computer, typewriters and calculators.
B. This center may be placed near or in the quiet center groupings.

   

Music Center:

A.

Records, a record player, rhythm instruments, music files, scarves, streamers, and song books are kept in this area.

B. It should be located near an electrical outlet and near the noisy centers.
C. Tape recorders are often used to play special tapes or music or to allow the children to create and replay their own.

 

Woodworking Center:

A. The Woodworking Center involves a workbench that is placed near a noisy area of the room that is closely supervised by an adult.
B. Nails, screws, bolt, and nuts are stored in separate containers, as are wood, hammers and saws.
C. Styrofoam, soft wood pieces, and other similar materials should be plentiful.

  

Sand/Water Center:

A. This center is flexible in that it can provide an area for children to manipulate sand with various objects or it can be altered to provide an area for children to explore water play.
B. Gravel, colored water, dirt, and other items may also be used.

 

Writing Centers:

A.

Children should feel that their writings are meaningful and valued.  Give the children easy access to writing materials to help them learn pre-reading skills.

B. Children should find ample materials such as:
    paper  
    pencils (of all sizes)  
    typewriters  
    envelopes  
    stamps  
    letters  
C. In addition to the writing center, there should be a "sign in sheet" for children to sign their names when they enter the classroom.
D. Clipboards in centers give children additional writing opportunities.
E.

Children should have opportunities to see their teacher write her name, a list, the roll etc. to advance their understanding of print.

 

 

ADDITIONAL INDOOR SPACE

 

In addition to the learning centers previously described, space is provided for large group activities in which all of the children participate. 

 

This area must be large enough to accommodate group games, circle time, movement, and dancing.

 

Lockers or "cubbies" provide each child with a place for his or her personal items.  These are usually located near the entrance to the classroom.  The lockers are labeled with the child's name and/or symbol.

 

 

    

DAILY ROUTINES

 

This information primarily applies to Head Start center staff (teachers, coordinators), although all agency employees whose position requires their presence in the centers at any time should be familiar with these general guidelines.

 

1. The children in the centers should always hold priority over any personal or staff business.  The atmosphere should be one in which the adults express joy at having the opportunity to be with the children.
2. Each child should be greeted individually each morning by both the staff member responsible for check-in and his/her classroom teacher(s).
3. Teachers should be free from all other responsibilities, duties and personal business during the prime teaching time.  To this end:
  a. The Site Manager and Education Specialist should schedule all conferences, meetings, etc., during the afternoons while children are napping.
  b. Staff will not be called to accept telephone calls during working hours, with the exception of emergencies.
  c. All necessary personal calls are to be made during the employee's break time and will be limited.  Cell phones should be put away while in the classroom.
  d. Coffee, sodas, cigarettes, etc., should be saved for break times only in designated areas; they are never to be consumed in front of the children.
4.

Meal Service

  a. Meals are to be served family style (bowls uncovered and placed in the center of the table with spoons in place               for serving).
  b. The exception is for foods that are too heavy or hot.
  c. Hot foods can be left on the cart to cool.
  d. Ones that are too heavy may be served with limited assistance from the teacher.
  e. Teachers should help children learn to set the tables.
  f. The goal is for children to complete the task unassisted.
  g. Teachers are to sit with the children during the meal so they will learn how to pass food.
  h. Teachers should talk with children during mealtime and also encourage children  to talk amongst themselves.
  i. Children should not be rushed through their meal.
  j. Children should be allowed thirty minutes to finish eating.
5. In classrooms where children are combined during breakfast (for one reason or another) they should be separated into their individual classrooms as soon after breakfast as possible. 
6. No child should be forced to remain idle for more that 2-3 minutes.
7. A set of name  tags should be kept on hand in each classroom for use when a new adult participates in classroom activities.
8. This is easier on the children as well as the volunteer.
9. These tags could also be used at the beginning of the school year to assist health personnel when children go on medical/dental appointments.
10.  When children are moving from one room to another, one teacher should always remain at the front of the group and another teacher in the back in order to maintain control. 
11. All broken equipment should be removed or repaired immediately. 
12. Allow children to share in the concern and care for missing parts and observe minor repairs.
13. The children should be taught to take care of their classroom's supplies and put items away when they are through with them.
14. Adults should NEVER discuss a child in front of ANY other children.
15. Adults should stoop down (or sit in a chair) to a child's level when speaking to him/her.
16. Children's clothing should always be protected while they are involved in messy artwork.
17. Smocks and large, old shirts should be available.
18. Teachers should always pre-prepare for each day's activities so that children will not have to wait for supplies to be gathered. 
19. Materials should be gathered either the previous afternoon or early the same morning.
20. If children are too rowdy during a particular activity, the activity and its presentation need to be evaluated.
21. Individual conferences with each teaching team should be held concerning daily schedules. 
22.

A copy of the lesson plan should be posted in the classroom.  (Lesson plans should be stored in a

      Folder for a full year).

23. An identical schedule should be posted in the classroom.
24. The teacher and teacher assistant should work as a team. 
25. The teacher and teacher assistant teacher should have shared responsibilities never one teacher having all the duties however, the overall classroom management is the lead teacher's responsibility. 
26. Smooth operation of a classroom is the direct result of a cooperative team effort and open communication. 
27. If one feels that he/she is being unfairly given all the work, this needs to be brought to the attention of the other teacher in the room.
28. If this is ineffective, the matter should be discussed in conference with the Site Manager and the Education Specialist.  Beyond this, other supervisors will become involved.
CHECK-IN PROCEDURES FOR HEAD START CENTERS

 

            POLICY

 

Once a child has been accepted into a Center, that child is Head Start is responsibility until the parent/guardian picks the child up from the Center.  In order to prevent a delay of care, it is best never to accept a sick child rather than trying to contact the parent after he/she has left the center.  A decision whether a child is permitted to stay should be made prior to the parent/guardian leaving the Center.

 

During “check-in” staff must inspect any backpacks, etc. of entering children only for any inappropriate or dangerous items such as guns, knives or other items that could be used as a weapon.  If these items are discovered during the inspection, the SITE MANAGER SHOULD BE IMMEDIATELY NOTIFIED.  Site Managers should immediately notify the Police and make parents aware of the incident.  Please refer to the IRATE VOLATILE PARENT POLICY if needed.

 

The teacher or an assigned staff person should have the responsibility of checking the children in to the center(s).

 

PROCEDURE

 

The following is the recommended guideline for the check in procedure for children in HEAD START centers.

 

 

These are general guidelines for children entering Head Start centers in the morning.  All Head Start staff to be on the alert for child abuse and communicable diseases in the Centers.  This will ensure a safe and healthy environment for all our children.

 

 

 

STEPS FOR CHECK-IN:

 

Never look under a child’s clothing unless the child says or acts in a manner that invites you to assess the child.  You MUST have another staff member present when looking under a child’s clothing.

  

Restroom Procedures

 

The program encourages respect of all children in all activities of the classroom.

 

1. Restroom procedures are supervised by adults at all times.  Teachers are to allow children to use the restroom individually or in small groups.  Boys and girls do not use toilets at the same time. Children should be encouraged to complete their task and return to the classroom as quickly as possible. Groups of children should not line up waiting to use the toilets.
2. The restroom procedures facilitate personal hygiene and independence.  Hand washing, zipping and buttoning independently, flushing, and taking turns allows children to develop their self-help skills. 

Teachers and parents are encouraged to communicate frequently concerning this developmental learning process. 

 

MEAL TIME

 

1. Meals are served family style with the children as helpers setting the table.  Children pass food from child-size bowls and serve themselves.  They are responsible for cleaning up spills, scraping their plates, putting their trash in the garbage can and washing off the table.
2. Children are encouraged to taste all foods but not forced to eat anything.  Teacher's model appropriate family style behaviors, including tasting all foods.
3. No other food will be allowed in the classroom unless it is for a cooking or nutrition activity.
4. Food is not used as a reward or punishment.
5. If dessert type foods (fruit) are served, they may be eaten at any time during the meal.
6. Conversation is encouraged during mealtime.

 

 

TOOTHBRUSH PROCEDURES

 

1. Children are required to brush their teeth after each meal.
2. Therefore, children will brush their teeth after the breakfast and lunch meal.
3. On the day of their “birthday celebration,” the children will also need to brush their teeth after this activity.
4. Each child will be given a plastic cup which the teacher will dispense a small amount of an ADA     approved toothpaste on the bottom of the cup.
5. Each child will utilize his/her toothbrush to manipulate the toothpaste on the individual toothbrush.
6. Afterwards, the child will rinse his/her mouth with water using the plastic cup.
7. The cup must be discarded after use. 
8. No more than two children at a time should be at the sink brushing his/her teeth. 
9. The other children can participate in other activities; avoid lining up and waiting.
10. Toothbrushes are air dried and stored appropriately.  To prevent cross contamination, toothbrushes are at least three inches apart.
11. The teacher should print child's name on their toothbrush.
12. Teachers should brush their teeth at least once a day to model proper and routine brushing.

 

OUTDOOR PROCEDURE

 

1. The playground is checked daily before the children are allowed to go outside.
2. Things to look for include: broken equipment, stray animals, and harmful trash (glass, cans, needles, etc.).
3. There is one hour scheduled for outdoor time, 30 minutes in the morning and 30 minutes in the afternoon. 
4. Planned outside activities come before free play.
5. There are at least two teachers on the playground at all times. 
6. Teachers are to keep moving and to interact with the children. 
7. The classroom schedule is followed to prevent too many children on the playground at one time.
8. During nice weather, it is permissible for indoor activities to be done outdoors.
9. All children should have the opportunity for outdoor play at least twice a day.  Teachers are not responsible for sun            screens or other skin protection creams.  Parents may provide these types of creams and apply before leaving the child. 

 

TEACHING FILES

 

 PICTURE FILES

 

1. Each teacher must keep an individual picture file. 
2. This file consists of different pictures mounted on construction paper, and is usually laminated or clear contact paper is used.
3. These cards can be used by the teacher to facilitate a theme discussion, or can be used by children in the story area. 
4. Children are to be encouraged to use descriptive language, their own creativity and develop their own stories.
5. Teachers can introduce problem-solving and critical thinking skills via the pictures.

 

TRANSITIONS

 

1. Transitions are used when children move from one area to another. 
2. Each teacher should have a variety of appropriate transition activities.
3. This resource is to be used when transitions are required. 
4. Teachers can use visual cues, songs, fingerplays, music, or verbal cues where listening skills are incorporated to make transitions smoother.
5. If you choose a song as a clean-up cue, BE CONSISTENT! 
6. Consistency helps with group management. 
7. Children feel safe and secure in knowing what the cue means and that the cue will be the same at all clean-up time.
8. Examples of some transition times are:  outside, large group to small groups, learning center, lunchtime, clean up, and restroom.

 

 TRANSFER OF CHILDREN

 

1. HEAD START stresses the importance of continuity as a focal point of each child’s growth and development.
2. The transfer of a child only serves to prolong the adjustment period.
3. Children are seldom transferred, but if necessary for any reason, the following criteria will be adhered to:  prior approval of Site Manager and Education Specialist, availability of space, assessment results, and the number of special needs children existing in the classroom.
4. Second year children will be placed in the same classroom unless extenuating circumstances exist.
5. The classes will be decided by the Site Manager and Education Specialist.
6. Newly enrolled children are placed in the classroom through the joint effort of the Site Manager and Education Specialist.

 

 

CENTER ACCIDENT REPORT

Database Form

 

1. The Center Accident Report is used to report any accident (severe or non-severe) that occurs during any activity that the child is engaged in during the program.
2. The information should include:
  A. Name of the center.
  B. Name of the child.
  C. Address.
  D. Age of the child.
  E. Name of the Parent or Guardian.
  F. Date of the accident.
  G. How the child was injured?
  H. If other children or adults were involved (never refer to another child by name).
  I. Was the Parent or Guardian informed?
  J. Was a doctor contacted?
  K. Description of the injury.
  L.

Medical services provided (first aid, ambulance, emergency, clinic and etc.)

3.

The form should then be signed and dated by the teacher or person in charge of the activity.

4.

It is then turned into the Site Manager and the white copy is filed in the child health record, the yellow copy is given to the parent and the pink copy is given to the Health Service Manager.

 

*For additional information, see the Health’s Standard Operating Procedures.

 

 

ACCESS TO CHILDREN'S RECORDS

 

All children records are stored on the HEAD START of Greater Dallas, Inc. database.

 

MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION (HC-26)

Performance Standard 1304.22(c)

               Minimum Standard 746.3801, 3803, 3805. 3807, 3809, 3811

POLICY

All medication administered in the center must be prescribed by a licensed health care provider.  Parents must inform Head Start staff and sign the Medication Dispensation form which gives staff permission to administer the medicine in the center.  The Medication Dispensation/Special Procedure form must be filled out by a licensed health care provider if the medication is given more than 10 days in the center.  Authorization for the Medication Dispensing form must be updated every six months by both the health care provider and parent.

 

Ideally, all medication should be given at home.  Time schedules for administration can be adjusted unless the dose is written time specific.  However, Head Start staff will not administer more than one dose in the center unless the child’s condition warrants an adjustment. 

 

All medicine must be checked off by a Health Staff or Site Manager’s designee in the absence of a health staff.  Staff will keep a log of all medicines administered in the center on the Medication /Special Procedure Log form.  This form will be kept in the Priority Note Book of the health office.  This log is designed to help health staff be informed of all children receiving medicine and provide an opportunity for education and or assistance to the teachers who administer the medication.  When the timeframe has expired, Health staff will inform staff and parents to request updated information and or medication if indicated.  All unused medicines should be returned to parents. 

 

All Medication must be kept in a locked closet, cabinet and/or container that is inaccessible to children and prevent spillage.  Each center should have a designated locked place in the classrooms or in the center for the storage of medication.  Medications that require refrigeration must be kept in a designated refrigerator or in a locked box in the staff’s refrigerator.

                  

All medicine given in the center must be prescribed by a health care provider and labeled by a pharmacist.  Labeling of any medicines must be checked for the following:

1. Authenticity of container.  Drugs must be in the original container issued by the pharmacist.
2. Medication name, route of administration and amount (dosage).
3. Physician’s name.
4. If there is insufficient dosage information or the label is unclear, contact the pharmacist or physician for clarification.  DO NOT ADMINISTER ANY MEDICINES WHEN STAFF DOES NOT UNDERSTAND THE INSTRUCTIONS ON THE LABEL.  Request parents to obtain another container with a clear label.
5. Never give medicine from a container that has been altered in any way.

 

If sample medications are given by a health care provider for administration in the center, the medications must be in an authentic container and labeled with the child’s name, medication name, and route of administration, amount of medication, physician’s name and telephone number. 

 

Requests to administer injectable medication or narcotics must be approved by the Health Coordinator.  If this situation occurs, a staffing will be held for each child to formulate an action plan of care and procedure.  Members will include parent(s), medical provider (or medical information) Site manager, classroom teacher, Health Specialist, Special Services, and the Health Coordinator.

 

SPECIAL PROCEDURES

 

When children are enrolled in Special Services, the Special Services Specialist will ensure that medicines are in the centers and updated every six months.  When children have special procedures to be performed by staff in the center, a staffing (all disciplines present) should be done prior to the child enrolling in the center.  When approval is obtained from the staffing (meaning staff is capable and can be trained to perform the procedure), Special Services Specialist will ensure orders are obtained from the health care providers and supplies are available in the center when indicated.  The child’s PCP should fill out the Medication Dispensation/Special Procedure form with instructions for performing the special procedure in the center.

 

Center staff will be trained by parents, health staff, and/or the nurse practitioner before performing any procedure independently.

 

 

INSTRUCTIONS

 

1. Parents will be encouraged to bring in the statement from the pharmacist stating the potential side effects of the medication.
2. All medication (including OTC) prescribed, may be given 10 center days or less without the Medication Dispensation form being filled out by the PCP.  However, parental signature must ALWAYS be obtained prior to administering the medication.  Have parent fill out and sign form.  Upon completion of medication put the form in the child’s folder in Section 10.
3. Medications prescribed “as needed” (PRN) must have specific directions for administration, including minimum time between doses and maximum number of doses and criteria for administration.  If the medication is required to be available for the child longer than 10 days, the Medication Administration form is required to be filled out by the health care provider.
4. Special Procedures prescribed “as needed” (PRN) must have specific instructions for when to perform the procedure and how often.  The Medication Administration/Special Procedure form must be filled out by the health care provider prior to performing any procedure.  For procedures only, this form is valid for 1 year.  Training will be provided (parent, health care provider, NP, etc.) to HSGD staff to use any equipment such as a nebulizer, catheterization, etc.
5. Staff will adhere to the label instructions.  Staff will watch for side effects and/or allergic reactions when administering medicine.  If a child’s reaction seems extreme (unusual/negative) reaction, HSGD staff will initiate emergency procedure and call 911.
6. No medicine will be administered nor a procedure performed past the PCP’s expiration date. 
A. If a child drops from the agency prior to the completing the medication, staff must make every attempt to return the unused medication to the child’s parent. If unsuccessful in returning medicine, all medications will be properly disposed (per Health Service manager’s instructions).
B. When unsuccessful in returning equipment and supplies, items should be brought to the Health office.  They will be stored for 1 year before disposal.
 
7.

The Dispensing of Medication/Special Procedure form must be posted inside the storage closet door or kept in a notebook within the room in order to maintain privacy.  This form should not be stored in plain view for all.  Once the child has completed the medication regiment, this form should be scanned in the Child Health record of the data system.

Siblings will not be permitted to share medications in the center unless a written statement is submitted to the center by a physician.
 
Parents will be required to request 2 sets of medication from the pharmacist.  This will ensure that the child will have medication available for both locations.  The medicine should stay in the center unless completed or expired.  Head Start will not support situations with parents carrying medicine between home and the center.
8. Medicines discovered in a back pack with a note to the teacher to give should not be administered.  If this occurs, staff should notify the site manager and the site manager should address this situation.

 

PROCEDURE FOR MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION

 

1. All medication administered in the center must be checked off by a Health Staff.  This would inform health staff of all children receiving medication in the center and allow the health staff to provide any education/assistance to the teachers when indicated.
2. The Teacher (s) in the classrooms will be responsible for administering, handling and storing all prescription medications.  If both teachers are absent, site managers’ designee will administer all medications scheduled for each classroom.
3. Staff must wash hands before administration of medicine.  The following steps are to be adhered to in order to prevent a medication error from happening.
4. Medicine removed from a locked cabinet
5. Identify correct child by:
  A. Ask the child to tell you his name
  B. Compare what the child said to the name that is written on the medication sheet
  C. compare the name on the container with the child’s statement and what is written on the form. 
6.

Read the label on the medicine container three times:

  A. When taking the container from the shelf.
  B. Before administering the medicine.
  C. Before returning the container to the shelf.
7. Return medicine to the cabinet and lock the door.
8. Wash hands before resuming classroom duties.
9. Do not attempt to re-administer medicines if the child vomits.  Notify the parent.
10. Re-administer the medicine only if the child spits it out and you are sure that none of the medicine was retained.  When in doubt, don’t administer the medicine just notify the parent.
11. ALL MEDICINE SHOULD BE INACCESSIBLE TO CHILDREN AT ALL TIMES.

The Staff person will document their administration of medicine on the Dispensation of Medication each time a dose of medication is administered to a child.  They must document:
1. Name of medication
2. Date & time given
3. Amount administered
4. Staff person administering the medication.


If a child misses a scheduled dose, it must be documented (i.e. child is absent) on the medication form.  Special circumstances, such as spills, adverse reactions, and refusal to take medicine must be documented on the form.  Staff should inform parents when these incidences occur. 

 

Staff should provide information to parents or physician if there are problems related to administration, side effects, or observable behavior changes with the child.  This information must be documented on the parent contact log.
SPECIAL PROCEDURES PERFORMED BY STAFF

1.

The Special Services Specialist (or health staff) will ensure orders are obtained from the PCP prior to performing any procedures in the centers.

2. All Staff (pre-determined by the staffing) will be adequately trained and checked off by Health staff or Nurse Practitioner prior to performing any procedures in the centers.
3. All equipment brought into the center will be checked off by Special Services and written on the Medication/Equipment Log form located in the Priority Notebook in the Health office.
4. The Teacher (s) in the classrooms will be responsible for performing the procedure.  If both teachers are absent, site manager will designate a trained staff person to perform the procedure.  If one is not available, then child may be sent home.
5. Staff must wash hands before the procedure.
6. Staff will perform the procedure as trained and per instructions received from PCP.
7. Staff must wash their hand after the procedure.
8. The Staff person will document when they performed the procedure the Dispensation of Medication/Special Procedure each time the procedure is performed.  They must document:
  A. Date and time given
  B. Results following (improved breathing, yellow urine, etc)
  C. Staff person performing the procedure

 

If a procedure is not performed (i.e. child is absent) or difficulty associated with performance, staff must document this on the Contact Log and inform parents.  Information will be provided to the PCP when indicated. 

MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION ON FIELD TRIP

 

Medication administration on field trips shall adhere to medication policy.  When possible, all medications should be given prior to the trip.  The following shall also apply:

 

1. Children requiring medication on field trips will be administered as prescribed when time specific.
2. Children requiring treatments for a recurring medical condition (such as asthmatic treatments) will receive a pre-trip treatment and if necessary, a post-trip treatment upon approval of the parent and/or the child's health care professional.
3. Inhalers are to be carried by the Lead Teacher.

 

If medication is to be administered at a different time than authorized, parents are to be notified 48 hours prior to the field trip.  Parents must sign authorization to change the time for administration prior the field trip.

 

Medication requiring cold storage will be stored and transported in a small cooler and separate from food items. The cooler should be light weight and transported with teachers when leaving the bus.  Medication not requiring cold storage shall be stored in the medication lock and transported with teachers when leaving the bus.

 

NO MEDICATION SHOULD BE LEFT ON THE BUS.

Concern:  Temperature on the bus may damage the medicine.

Concern:  Staff may be too far away from the bus when the medicine is needed.

 

Staff must record the date, time and amount of any medications administered per licensing requirements on the medication form.

 

SPECIAL SITUATIONS

 

For special situations, such as poisonings, IPECAC will only be administered when authorized by Poison Control Center.

MEDICATION ERRORS

 

Medication errors are defined as administering the incorrect dosage, or administering the wrong medicine to the wrong child.  The following steps should take place:

 

1. Immediately notify parents, child’s doctor, Site Manager, Associate Head Start Director, Human Resource Director, Health Specialist, and Health Service Manger.
2. Fill out an Incident/Injury Report.
3. Call EMS (911), if indicated.
4. Follow up with parents, monitor and document child’s condition (2 days) to assist with identifying any potential side effects of the medication.

 

MEDICATION/SPECIAL PROCEDURE LOG (HC-86)

 

The Health staff should be aware of all children receiving medicine and medical equipment in the centers. The purpose of this form is to keep a log of all children who are taking medication or have equipment in the centers.   This form will be kept in the Health Assistants’ Priority Note Book in the center.  When a medication’s timeframe has expired, staff should return the unused medication to parents or request updated information and medication when indicated.  Special Service Specialists will be required to use this form and assist with updating health information when indicated.

 

EQUIPMENT

 

All equipment for special needs children are required to be checked in by Special Services Specialist or designated person per Site Manager’s instruction.  Special Services should inform the health staff and document on this log form all equipment in the centers.  This form should be used to keep a record of when equipment is present or leave the center.  Special Services or the classroom teacher should sign this form when equipment leaves the center.

 

PROCEDURE

 

1. Parents should inform teachers when a child needs to take medicine at the center.
2. Teachers or parents (guardian) should take the medicine to the health office for the Medication Dispensation form.
3. Health staff must document the medication, the child and which room the medicine is stored on the Medication Log form (This is confirms that health staff is informed of the medicine in the center, the start date of the medication, route of, administration, and provide assistance when indicated). Ensuring that the medication is not expired.
  A. Health staff should completely fill out the information on the log sheet.
  B. Write name of the child.
  C. Write the child’s classroom number.
  D. The name of the medication
  E. Start date (8/10/04)
  F. Health staff signature
  G. End date (indicated the stop date: 10 day= 8/19/04 or 6 months Feb 2/05)
  H.

Comments are simple statement relating to the administration of the medication.

§  Child completed medicine

§  Child absent did not complete medicine;

§  Medication permission form expired

§  Returned medicine to parent. Etc.

  I. At the end of the specified time frame (10 days, 1 month, 6 month, etc), Health staff should inform the teacher and parent that medicine will be discontinued unless an updated order and or medicine has been received from the physician.
    Health staff should retrieve the medication form and file in the child’s folder in section.
  J. All unused medicine should be returned to the parents.
  K. Staff should document any additional statements on the child’s progress notes.
4.

Health staff signature.  Staff should sign here when the medication or time frame has been met.

5.

For equipment or supplies needed for special procedures:

  A. Special Services Specialist should obtain the equipment and document on the form what type and where the equipment will be stored.
  B. Special Services is responsible for ensuring needed supplies and equipment is available when needed in the center.
  C. In the event the equipment is taken from the center by teachers, staff or parents, they should sign out on the Log form.
  D. When equipment is returned to the center, Special Services or designated staff should document on the Log form.
  E. For certain diagnosis, a child should not be allowed to attend the center or go on field trips if their equipment/supplies are not available for them.

 Health Service Manager will advise when indicated.

  

FIELD TRIP SAFETY

               Performance Standard 1304.53(a) (6)

Minimum Standard 746.3001; 746.3003; 746.3005

 

If a child becomes injured or ill provide first aid as necessary. Closely observe the child for changes in temperature, consciousness, behavior, slurred speech, bleeding, etc. If changes are noticed, take the child to the nearest medical facility.

 

If a child is bitten by an animal on a field trip, transport them to the nearest medical facility. Contact Animal Control and attempt to observe and monitor the location of the animal until Animal Control arrives.

 

If at any time a child requires medical attention, call 911 to transport the child to the nearest medical facility and immediately contact the Site Manager. The Site Manager will contact the Associate Head Start Director, a Health Specialist as necessary, and the child's parent(s). The Site Manager will inform the parent(s) where the child is being taken, and to meet the employee there. An Incident/Illness Report (Child) must be completed and forwarded to the Associate Head Start Director and HR Director. If the child needs medical attention, then the Incident/Illness report must be submitted to Licensing.

 

If the field trip compromises coverage with supervision of children (children/staff ratio), the trip should end resulting in children and staff returning to the center immediately.

 

ILL CHILD ON FIELD TRIPS

 

If a child becomes ill during a field trip, perform the following:

 

1.

 Ask the child what they have eaten in the past couple of hours.

2.

Review the child's information to see if they are taking any type of medication.

3.

Check child for evidence of:

   

§  a bite from an insect, spider, or animal
§  a skin rash
§  a fever
§  pale complexion
§  any other symptoms that may indicate condition

4. Contact the Site Manager or Health Specialist with the above information and ask for instruction.

 

INJURED EMPLOYEE

 

If an employee is injured during a field trip and must be transported to a medical facility, contact 911 to have them transported. The Site Manager, Assistant Site Manager, or Education Specialist is to contact the Bus Driver and report the incident. If additional supervisory persons are needed, the Site Manager will arrange for someone to go and meet the group.

 

An Injury Investigation Questionnaire must be completed and submitted to Safety personnel and processed.

 

In case of an emergency during transportation to or from the field trip destination, the following shall apply [The following is incorporated from the Bus Incident Standard Operating Procedures (Human Resources SOP# SM6001)]:

 

 

 

Emergency Contact Information Card

Triad Associate Director

Office Number

East

Kathy White

214-275-2054

West

Nell Ellis

972-237-4500

South

Bonnie Buchanan

972-283-6476

Transportation Coordinator

Albert Old Crow

972-283-6409

Human Resources Director

Marcus Saldana

972-283-6416 (Cell  469-855-5566)

External Affairs Director

Deneeco Young

972-283-6472

Police / Fire / EMS - 911

           
 

 

INCIDENT/ILLNESS (HS-4) REVISED 8/03

POLICY

(Minimum Standard 746.307)

 

The Incident/ Illness Report are used to describe any accident/illness (severe or non-severe) which occurs either at HEAD START centers or HEAD START sponsored activities.  This form is usually filled out by the teacher in charge of the child during the time of injury/illness.  When a minor accident occurs in the centers, Teachers should:

 

1.

Never leave the child alone and implement First Aid Care.

2. Fill out an Incident/Illness Report Form on the data base system.
3. Notify the parent/guardian about the accident/illness (see below).
4. Distribute the completed form to the following staff:
 
  • Original Copy – Site Manager’s Notebook Folder
  • Copy - Parent/Guardian
5. When an emergency occurs, teachers or Site Manager (delegate) should ensure that a copy of the report is faxed to the Human Resource Director.
6. Any situation may be declared an emergency.  When in doubt err on the side of the child and call 911.
7. In the event that the ambulance is called implement the emergency procedure.

 

WHEN TO NOTIFY PARENTS

 

After the safety of the child is assured, parent must be notified immediately:

 

1. When the illness or injury requires medical attention by a health care professional.
2. Has symptoms requiring exclusion from the center (communicable diseases, etc.)
3. If the child had been involved in any situation that placed the child at risk.  For example, a child being left in a vehicle or a child from wandering away from the center unsupervised, etc.
4. If the child has been involved in any situation that is unsafe in the center, such as fire, flood or damage to the center as a result of severe weather.

 

Parent may be notified of less serious injuries when the child is picked up from center.  Less serious injuries include, but not limited to, minor cuts, scratches, and bites from other children requiring first-aid treatment by employees.  IF THE CHILD’S APPEARANCE HAS DRAMATICALLY CHANGED FROM WHEN THEY ARRIVED, PARENTS SHOULD BE NOTIFIED IN ADVANCE.

 

 

PROCEDURE

                                           

Fill the form out completely with the following information:

 

1. Never leave the child alone
2. Fill in the Child’s name.
3. Fill in birth date (month, day, year)
4. Was Licensing notified? (if required)
5. Child’s address.
6. Date of Incident/Illness
7. Time of Incident/Illness
8. Fill in where the Incident occurred
9. Name of the staff who provided care
10. Fill in parent(s) or guardian(s) name
11. Date the Incident/Illness occurred
12. Time parent’s were notified
13. Child’s Doctor Name (if called for illness or if EMS was called)
14. Doctor’s address (city, state, zip) (if called for chronic illness or if EMS was called).
15. Doctor’s telephone number including area code. (illness or if EMS was called)
16. Date and time doctor (EMS) was consulted (if applicable)
17. Was First Aid provided and a description of what was done?
18. Was Medical attention required ( EMS)
19. If so when called and time they arrived to the scene.

 

Details of Incident that Caused Injury or Placed child at Risk

 

This section should be filled out in the event of an injury to the child or situations at the center which the child was placed at risk. 

 

1. Describe in detail the injury or risk in which the child was placed
2. Where and how did the injury occur?
3. Were there other children involved?  If so their names.
4. Name of the staff who witnessed the incident/injury
5. Other staff present at the time of the incident/injury

 

               Details of On-set of Illness While in Care

 

This section should be filled out when the child’s status changes while in the care of the staff at the center.

 

1. Type of Illness
2. Does the illness require exclusion from care
3. If a communicable disease were other parent notified.
4. If it was a communicable disease, is it a reportable disease to the Health Department.
5. What was the child’s temperature?
6. Was medication given?  If so what?

 

RESPONSIBLE PARTY

 

The person in attendance during the incident/illness should fill out the report on the database, print the report, sign and date the form.  The site manager should be informed and they should sign the form also.  Parents should sign and date the form when indicated (immediately but no longer than 48 hours).  When the form is signed, the original should be kept in the site Manager’s office in a notebook. 

 

In the event that the child is picked up by a person not the legal guardian or parent, that person should receive a copy of the form.  The original form should be kept in the site Manager’s office until the parent is able to come to the center to sign the form.  If this is not possible, a copy of the form may need to be mailed by certified mail to ensure that the child’s parent/guardian receives the notice.  The original form

should be kept in a notebook in the site manager’s office.  This information is stored for (3-5 years) based on the agency’s policy. 

 

IF THE CHILD IS TREATED FOR DENTAL EMERGENCY THE FOLLOWING GUIDELINES SHOULD BE FOLLOWED:

 

D)           DENTAL EMERGENCY FIRST AID

Performance Standard 1304.22 (a) (1)

 

1.           THE DENTAL EMERGENCY FIRST AID FORM SHOULD BE:

 

1. Posted at each Center in the following locations:

Main Bulletin Board + Each Classroom

                                   OR

Site Manager’s Office + Each Classroom

2. Posted in a location visible to all HEAD START staff, parents and volunteers.
3. Posted in English, Spanish and Vietnamese.
4. Read thoroughly by HEAD START staff at the beginning of the school year (August) and checked periodically to ensure comprehension.
5. Filled out so that the name, address and telephone number of the dentist who provides dental services are legible.

 

2)           IN THE EVENT OF A DENTAL EMERGENCY:

 

1. The Site Manager should notify the Health Specialist and the Health Assistant responsible for that Center immediately.
2. The parent(s) or guardian(s) needs to be notified immediately.
3. The child’s complete folder, as well as the insurance claim form needs to be taken to the dentist’s office.
4. If the emergency is severe and requires immediate attention, the Site Manager or designated HEAD START staff member will transport child to the dentist’s office.  The child’s complete folder, as well as the insurance claim form, will be taken to the dentist’s office as well.
5. The Head Start staff will meet all parties involved at the dentist’s office.

 

DENTAL EMERGENCY FIRST AID FORM (HC-47)

 

ALL INCIDENTS SHOULD BE HANDLED QUICKLY AND CALMLY;

A HYSTERICAL CHILD IS LIKELY TO COMPLICATE THE TREATMENT AND CAUSE FURTHER TRAUMA.

 

1.

WEAR LATEX GLOVES AND CHECK FOR BLEEDING.  IF THE CHILD IS BLEEDING:

  A. STOP BLEEDING BY APPLYING PRESSURE TO THE AREA.
  B. WASH THE AREA WITH CLEAN, COOL WATER.
  C.

PLACE INSTANT COLD PACK (OR ICE IN A CLEAN CLOTH) ON THE INJURED AREA, TO REDUCE SWELLING.

2. IF TOOTH IS KNOCKED OUT, FRACTURED, CHIPPED, BROKEN, OR LOOSE:
  A. CALM THE CHILD.
  B. IF INJURED AREA IS DIRTY, WASH GENTLY WITH CLEAN, COOL WATER.
  C. PLACE INSTANT COLD PACK (OR ICEIN A CLEAN CLOTH) ON THE INJURED AREA, TO REDUCE SWELLING.
  D. WRAP TOOTH IN DAMP CLOTH OR GAUZE, DO NOT CLEAN.
  E. TAKE CHLD AND WRAPPED TOOTH TO DENTIST IMMEDIATELY.
3. IF TEETH ARE LOOSENED IN AN ACCIDENT:
  A. RINSE OUT THE CHILD’S MOUTH WITH CLEAN, COOL WATER.
  B. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO MOVE THE TEETH OR JAW.
  C. TAKE THE CHILD TO THE DENTIST IMMEDIATELY.
4. IF TOOTH IS KNOCKED INTO THE GUMS:
  A. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO FREE OR PULL ON THE TOOTH.
  B. RINSE OUT THE CHILD’S MOUTH WITH CLEAN, COOL WATER.
  C. TAKE THE CHILD TO THE DENTIST IMMEDIATELY.
5. IF THE TONGUE, CHEEKS OR LIPS ARE INJURED:
  A. RINSE AFFECTED AREA WITH CLEAN, COOL WATER.
  B. PLACE INSTANT COLD PACK (OR ICE IN A CLEAN CLOTH) ON THE INJURED AREA, TO REDUCE SWELLING.
  C. TAKE THE CHILD TO THE DENTIST OR A PHYSICIAN IF BLEEDING CONTINUES OR IF WOUND IS LARGE.
6. IN THE EVENT OF ANY SOFT TISSUE INJURY, AS IN THE CASE WHERE THE TONGUE OR LIPS BECOME STUCK TO AN OBJECT AND THE TISSUE TEARS:
  A. COVER THE AFFECTED AREA WITH GAUZE.
  B. STOP THE BLEEDING BY DIRECT PRESSURE WITH LATEX GLOVED HANDS.
  C. TAKE THE CHILD TO THE DENTIST OR A PHYSICIAN.
7. IF TOOTH IS KNOCKED OUT WRAP IT IN A DAMP PAPER TOWEL AND TAKE IT WITH THE CHILD TO THE DENTIST.

 

IF A CHILD NEEDS MEDICAL EMERGENCY SERVICES IMPLEMENT THE FOLLOWING GUIDELINES:    

DEFINITION

 

Emergencies are defined as conditions that require immediate intervention, which may result in serious disability, loss of limb, or death if immediate care is not given.  The decision to call an ambulance involves experience and/or judgment.  When in doubt err on the side of the child and call 911.

POLICY

 

There will be occasions when a situation may be declared as a medical emergency.  Medical emergency will be handled in a way that will provide a quick and safe response.  Head Start staff will implement the emergency procedure when indicated.  The following steps should be implemented:

 

All staff will receive training by the Health Specialist or the Teaching Module (annually) regarding emergency situations.  Emergency Accident policy Procedures should be posted at each center in the following locations: main bulletin board or site manager’s office, and in each classroom.  In centers that have a high population of Hispanics or Asians, Emergency Accident Procedures should be posted in both languages in the classroom:

PROCEDURE

 

1. A child is injured while in the care of Head Start staff and warrants immediate medical attention.
2. Parents and Site Manager should be informed immediately.
3. Associate Triad Directors, Health Coordinator, and Human Resources Director and should be informed within 24.
4. Licensing may need to be called.  If so, this must be done within 48 hours.
5. Children should be transported to a medical facility ASAP (via ambulance, staff or parent depending on the seriousness of the injury). 
6. Teachers will fill out the Incident/Illness report (HS-4) and file as previously discussed.
7. The child’s notebook with the Health History and Service Permission Forms should accompany the child being transported to an emergency room or clinic.
8. A Health Service Risk (HRS) insurance form should be sent if the child has no medical insurance.
9. Health Staff will fax a copy of the Incident/Illness form and the insurance form to the Human Resource Director ASAP.
10. Health Staff will fax a copy of the Incident/Illness form to the Health Content Area office ASAP.
11. Health Staff will fax the HRS Insurance form to the company ASAP.
12. If the child is unable to return to the center, the Family Advocates or Health staff should follow-up with the family (within 3 days) and document the information in the family contact log.

 

HEAD START STAFF WILL ADHERE TO THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURES FOR SEVERLY INJURED CHILDREN OR CHILD WITH MINOR INJURIES AT HEAD START CENTERS AND/OR HEAD START SPONSORED ACTIVITIES.

BASIC EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN (ARC First Aid plan)

 

1. Survey the Scene
2. A primary survey of the person
3. Contact the Emergency Medical Services System for Help
4. A Secondary Survey

EMERGENCY ACCIDENT PROCEDURES FORM (HC-46)

Posted in the class rooms

 

1.

PROCEDURES FOR A SEVERELY INJURED CHILD

  A. Someone trained in First Aid/CPR should remain with the child.
  B. Do not move the child if there is a possible broken bone, neck or back injury.
  C. Cover the child with a blanket to prevent shock.
  D. Keep the child quiet and calm.
  E. Apply direct pressure to points or to the bleeding area with latex gloved hands.
  F. Perform CPR if necessary.
2. ANOTHER PERSON SHOULD PERFORM THE FOLLOWING:
  A. Another HEAD START staff should telephone an Emergency Ambulance when indicated (911).
  B. Notify the Health Specialist/Assistant responsible for that center.
  C. Notify the child’s parent or guardian of the emergency. Instruct the parent/guardian to meet the child at the emergency room or clinic.
  D. Instruct the Paramedic to transport the child to the nearest hospital in the area.

   HOSPITAL: ______________________________

   ADDRESS: ______________________________

   PHONE: _____________________________

  E. Take the child’s Notebook and Insurance Claim Form to the Emergency room or clinic.
  F. If parent/guardian or emergency contact person(s) is not available, then use the Services Permission Form for authorization for the child to receive emergency medical attention.
  G. Notify the Associate Head Start Director for any major emergency.
  H. Notify the Health Coordinator for any major emergency.

 

SITUATIONS WHICH REQUIRE IMMEDIATE MEDICAL ATTENTION

 

               Any time a child’s life may be at risk or possibility of permanent injury, seek immediate medical attention.

 

               Call 911 if:

 

1.

The child has difficulty breathing or is unable to speak

2. The child’s skin or lips looks blue, purple or gray
3. The child is unconscious
4. The child becomes less responsive
5. After a head injury, the following occurs:
  A. decrease level of alertness
  B. confusion
  C. complain of head hurting “really bad”
  D. vomiting occurs
  e. irritability
  F. difficulty walking
6. Child has a cut or burn that is large or deep and/or won’t stop bleeding.
7. The child is vomiting blood
8. The child has a severe stiff neck, headache, and fever.
9. The child is dehydrated: sunken eyes, lethargic, not making tears, and not urinating.

 

               URGENT CARE

 

Some situations have urgent care that do not necessarily require ambulance transport but still need medical attention.  Some of those were described in the Acute Illness and First Aid Guidelines.  The following situations require medical attention within at least one hour:

 

1. Fever in a child less than 2 months old
2. A quickly spreading purple or red rash
3. A large amount of blood in the stool
4. A cut that requires stitches
5. Any medical condition specifically identified a plan of care for children with special needs or with known health problems.

 

When this situation occurs, staff should

1. Remain calm.
2. Locate someone trained for CPR and First Aid and should remain with the child at all times.
3. Provide First Aid/CPR when indicated.
4. Call the child’s legal guardian.

 

 

EMERGENCY EVACUATION PROCEDURES

 

 

1. The same procedures for a fire drill are to be followed.
2. When all children are accounted for, Head Start and personal vehicles are used to transport the children to a pre-assigned destination.
3. Children are to travel in seat belts and be supervised at all times.
4. When the destination is reached, immediately notify Head Start Central Office and the parents of the children.
5. Each Center has an Emergency Evacuation Plan for its specific location.

 

 

 FIRE DRILL

 

1. During a fire drill, teachers and children are to immediately stop what they are doing and proceed in an orderly fashion to the designated exit.
2. One teacher is to be at the front to lead the children, and the other teacher is to be last to check the room for children and to close the door behind them.
3. Proceed to a pre-assigned area outdoors and count to make sure all are present.
4. The roll book is taken outside with the group.
5. Emergency cards, and first aid (fanny packs) should also be taken outside with the children.
6. The teachers wait until all is clear before they proceed back into the building.

 

TORNADO DRILL

 

1. During a tornado drill, teachers and children are to immediately stop what they are doing and proceed to a pre-assigned inner wall away from windows and doors.
2. Children are to sit facing the wall with their knees to their chest. 
3. Children place their heads between their knees and clasp their hands behind their neck.
4. Teachers sit behind the children facing the wall in the same position as the children until the danger has passed.
5. Blankets and pillows may be used to cover the children to protect them from flying objects.

 

* For additional information, see the Social Services/Parent Involvement’s Standard Operating Procedures.

 

  

 

INCLEMENT WEATHER PROCEDURES

 

Inclement Weather Procedures

 

When the school district in the area in which the center/facility is located is closed, opening late or leaving early due to bad weather conditions, then the center/facility will follow that plan.  If the closing of the I.S.D. is due to gas reduction, Head Start will remain open.

 

 

 

LESSON PLAN

 

1. The lesson plan is a tool for the teacher to use in order to plan the week's activities for the classroom using the Scholastic Curriculum.
2. It is a detailed written documentation of activities, which include multicultural activities, materials, objectives, and all plans to be carried out for the week. 
3. The activities planned should not only be theme related, but they should also be based on the information gathered from the children’s portfolios as to their individual needs and developmental levels.
4. The lesson plan is to focus around a certain theme.
5. The Education Specialist evaluate the lesson plan and provide assistance accordingly and sign the final copy of the lesson plan.
6. New lesson plans are developed weekly by the teaching team even if you are continuing the same theme.
7.  When planning a unit, the teacher is to make sure that all materials are available for that particular week.
8. Teachers are to refer to their teaching resources files.

 

 

                              Codes for the I. E. P.: Special Needs = Red

                              Individual Needs = Child's Number

                             

                        

These codes are to be documented throughout the lesson plan.

 

INDIVIDUALIZING SKILLS ON LESSON PLANS

 

 

1. Identify activities on the lesson plan that relate to the skills on the on-going assessment.
2. Identify a child or group of children that need to work on these skills.
3.

the children's number placed by learning activities are on both A&B above

 See sample lesson plans and lesson planning in Appendix H in the Teacher Handbook.

 

 

HOME VISITS

 

The home visit allows the teacher to review the Portfolio with the parent/guardian, receive parent/guardian input, and observe the child’s home environment and review all parent “Take Home Activities.”  As well as build a relationship with the parent/guardian.  Home visits are to be done twice a year for each child.

 

The first home visit will begin in July and be completed by the end of October.  The second home visit will begin in February and be completed by the beginning of March, except for children who enroll late.

 

The home visit form is taken on each home visit.  Teachers create the Home Visit form in the Data Base (making sure the general information is filled out) prior to the visit.  The teachers enter the parent information following the visit.  Both teacher and parent will sign the database document.  The Education Specialist signs from the data base and prints the form to be put in the child’s individual portfolio by the teacher and a copy to the parent.    

 

While preparing materials for the visit the teachers can decide which “Take Home Activity” they will work on with the parent (i.e. discussing how they used them, did they have questions about there use, how did the child respond to the activity, how long and how many times did they use the activity and ask the parent did they want to add something to the activity that may have worked well for them).  In addition, the teachers can discuss how they are using similar activities in the classroom.

 

·        This information must be documented on the Home Visit Form in some detail (i.e. naming the “Take Home Activity” and what was     discussed about the activity) in the Parent/Teacher Comment section of the Home Visit Form.

·        When the Home Visit Information is entered into the Data Base under (In-Kind Module) go to Service Record and scroll down to “Other” and write Parent Take Home Activity (Activities) Reviewed on Home Visit.

 

NOTE:  After three attempts have been made and all efforts are exhausted and a home visit was not completed each attempt must be documented on the Parent Contact Form in General Module of HSGD database. 

 

“Though HS and EHS programs are directed in 45 CFR 1304.40 (i) to make two home visits a year to each child’s family, exceptions are made for parents who expressly forbid such visits.  Parent participation in Early Head Start and Head Start cannot be a condition of the child’s participation and children cannot be dropped from HS enrollment if their parents choose to not have home visits.  In such cases, the HS program should continue to work with the parents, and look to increase the number of parent-teacher contacts to four, in place of the required two home visits and two parent-teacher contactsThese contacts can take place at the program site, or in other neutral places that afford some privacy, such as a library or a park.”

 

“Documentation of these efforts should be kept at the program to show that the program has done all it can to encourage the parent(s) to participate in home visits and/ or four parent teacher contacts.”

 

HEAD START of Greater Dallas, Inc. requires a parent to sign the Refusal of Services Form if they do not wish to participate in the two required home visits.  The teacher will inform the Education Specialist and the Education Specialist will have the parent sign the Refusal of Services form.  

Based upon family needs, a family may warrant more than two home visits annually.

 

Home Visit Process/ First and Second

 

For complete details of the Home Visit Process refer to the “TEACHER HANDBOOK” pages 81-83.

 

 

PARENT/TEACHER CONFERENCES

 

1. Parent teacher conferences are completed two times each year.  They are scheduled for the Fall and Spring of each program year.  Each conference gives the teacher and the parent an opportunity to discuss each child’s progress on their on-going assessment.
2. Teachers may also discuss the results of the agency screening, transition information, and provide the parents with sample activities that can be done at home.
3. Teachers should have the conference form, child’s portfolio and Home Visit form available to discuss the child’s progress.
4. Parents are encouraged to discuss their overall feeling about the services that their family has received while attending Head Start.  There is space for the parent to write down their comments and to discuss their child’s transitioning in and out of the program.
5. The teacher and the parent sign and date the form.
6. All parent conference forms are checked and signed by the Education Specialists.  If everything is complete, the teacher will file one copy in the child’s portfolio and have a copy available for the parent.

        

 

PARENT/ TEACHER CONFERENCE

FORM

 

 

All Forms are located in the Agency’s Database

 

 

TRANSITION PORTFOLIO

 

 

The children’s transition portfolios are for their future Kindergarten Teacher.  Parents are given the transition folders to take to their child’s next educational placement.

 

The following items are placed in the child’s Transition Portfolio which is a collection of information that will tell the story of who the child is and what kinds of activities and work he/she has completed over the course of a year.  Assessment information is also included so the Kindergarten Teacher will know how the child has progressed developmentally.

 

The Transition Portfolio consists of the following:

 

v  Parent release of records form

v  Health summary (including physical, dental, vision and hearing screens)

v  The on going developmental assessment or the LAP Parent Report

v  The Student Profile check list (shows social skills and academic)

v  Samples of the child’s work (i.e. art and writing samples)

 

 

NON-FEDERAL SHARE

 

The Education Content Area will be responsible for obtaining nonfederal share.  The nonfederal share is 20% of the yearly operating budget.

 

The nonfederal share will be obtained by:

1.      Volunteer time

2.      Donations

 

All volunteer hours (parent or community members) concerning education will be counted by the content area.  The volunteer rate will be a professional rate (set by the professional volunteer) or non-professional rate (set by HSGD).

 

 

All donations received for the Content Area will be counted toward the nonfederal share for the content area.

 

 

 

The Education Specialist will coordinate the tabulation of the center’s nonfederal share with their respective Family Advocate.  The Education Services Director and Education Coordinators will coordinate their nonfederal share with the Community Development Resource Associate.

 

v  Center staff will count all SRI Teachers and TSR (Texas School Ready) Mentors as non federal shares.

 

 

 

COMPLETING THE HSGD FIELD TRIP AUTHORIZATION FORM

 

1. This form is used to request specific educational outings for the children.
2. The request is contingent upon availability of transportation and scheduling. Note "Transportation's Field Trip Calendar" is completed yearly and distributed to each center.
3. The Field Trip Handbook, Thematic Guide and additional resources contain many suggested field trips as well as related guidelines.
4. Field Trip Authorization forms must be filled out completely before they are submitted or they will be returned unapproved.

 

The Transportation Coordinator assigns available dates and days to each center.  The Education Specialist is aware of the dates available for the year and is responsible for distributing the dates evenly among classrooms.

 

It is recommended that each classroom plan at least four field trips per year.  The availability of funds per center will be the deciding factor as to how many field trips are actually taken during the year.

 

Procedures for In House Field Trips:

 

1. For in-house field trips, please have the guest fill out an in-kind form.
2. The in-house field trips do not have to go through the full approval process, but must be approved         by the Site- Manager and the Education Specialist.
3. The copies of the field trip forms will be given to the Education Specialist.

 

Note:  Nature walks more than six blocks radius from the center require a field trip form.

Follow-up contacts for field trips should be made two weeks prior to the date of the field trip.  Be sure to call a day before to confirm the field trip.

 

FIELD TRIP RELEASE FORM

 

The Field Trip Release form is needed before any child can participate on a field trip.  The Parent/Guardian is to fill out the form and sign their name and give the form back to the teacher at least twenty four hours prior to the trip.

 

1. The teacher can fill out the name of the child, field trip and date.
2. The teacher will obtain the parents'/guardians' signature.
3. The teacher will give all signed forms for each field trip to the Site Manager.

 

Completing the HSGD Database Field Trip Authorization Form

 

1. Today’s Date:  This is the date this request is entered into the database system.
2. Center:  Enter your center name.
3. Restaurant: Enter the name of the establishment and include the physical address in the Field Trip Destination section.  If you are having sack lunches enter SACK LUNCH and include the physical address of where the lunch will take place.
4. Total Number of Children:  Enter the number of children enrolled in each classroom participating in this activity.
5. Cost Per Person:  Enter the dollar amount.
6. Initials:  The Nutrition Specialist will enter their initials in this section to indicate meal approval.
7. Classroom Number:  List the classroom number(s) participating.
8. Monitors:  List monitors by name, there should be two monitors listed per classroom.
9. Field Trip Date:  Date of the activity.
10. Time Leaving:  Enter the time the bus will leave the center.  The earliest time an activity can leave the center is 9:30 AM due to safety issues.
11. Time Returning:  Enter the time the bus will arrive at the center upon completion of the activity.
12. Field Trip Destination:  Enter the physical address of the primary destination and also include the physical address of the Restaurant if applicable.
13. Telephone:  Enter the establishment’s contact number for the Field Trip destination.
14. Contact Person:  Name of person at the establishment.
15. Education Purpose and Objectives:  List appropriate description of activities.
16. List all Adults/Volunteers Participating:  This is to include other teachers/staff not listed in the monitor’s section, this includes parents/volunteers.
17. Site Manager’s Signature and Date:  Enter the date you signed the form: Please do not sign or process the form if the date is inside the thirty (30) day time period prior to the field trip date.
18. Education Specialist’s Signature and Date:  Enter the date you signed the form: Pleas do not sign or process the form if the date is inside the thirty (30) day time period prior to the field trip date.
19. Associate Head Start Director Signature and Date:  Enter the date you signed the form: Please do not sign or process the form if the date is inside the thirty (30) day time period prior to the field trip date.
20. Transportation Coordinator Signature and Date:  Date the information was processed.
21. Disapproved:  This can be not approved by the Site Manager, Education Specialist, Associate Head Start Director or the Transportation Coordination depending of the appropriateness and the time constraints.

 

FIELD TRIP EVALUATION FORM

 

1. The Field Trip Evaluation form is used to evaluate all field trips, including in-house field trips.
2. Every question on the evaluation form is to be completed in order for the Education Specialist to  evaluate the field trip for future use.
3. The form is to be turned in within one week after the field trip to the Site Manager so that the Site-       Manager and the Education Specialist can review it.
4. This form is to be kept in the Center Field Trip File.

 

 

CLASSROOM DAILY ATTENDANCE

 

DAILY MEAL COUNT AND ATTENDANCE RECORD

 

 

 

1.      Go to Database

 

 

2.      Click “?” Box

 

 

3.      Go to Nutrition Module

 

 

4.      Select Daily Meal Count Instructions and click

 

 

5.      Complete form as directed.

 

 

 

SIGN-IN/SIGN-OUT FORM

 

 

1. This form is used when a child is brought to the center, picked up at the center and/or taken and returned during the day. 
2. The form is to be replaced each morning and properly dated by center staff. 
3. Each classroom (generally) has its own form, (although smaller centers may use only one form for all children).

 

Parents are to provide the following information: 

 

1. Child's name.
2. Time the child was brought into the center.
3. Parent/guardian name that brought the child.
4. Time the child left the center.
5. Name of the parent/guardian transporting the child.

  

 

PARENT CONTACT DOCUMENTATION FORM

 

 

1.  Go to database

 

2.  Click “?”

 

3.  Click Education Module 

 

4.  Click Education then open

 

5.  Stroll down to #9 Parent Contact

 

6.  Follow instructions for completing Parent Contact Form

 

 

* For additional information, see the Social Services/Parent Involvement’s Standard Operating Procedures.

 

 

TB TESTING FOR VOLUNTEERS (HC-37) (HC-96)

Performance Standard 1304.52 (j) (2)

Minimum Standard 746.1403 (2003)

Minimum Standard 746.1103 (2003)

 

Caregivers which are assigned responsibility for the care and supervision of children require a different level of skill and knowledge than employees that may have contact with children but are not responsible for their care.

 

Volunteers, who are regularly or frequently present at the child care center but not counted in the childcare ratio, must comply with minimum standards that apply to employees. 

 

DEFINITION

§  Regularly or frequently- is considered to be more than 6 hours in a thirty day period. 

          

POLICY

Based on the Minimum Standards, the Performance Standard and the cost of vaccines to the Agency, Head Start will adhere to the following policy:

1. Parents who volunteer regularly or frequently at the center will be required to have a TB skin test annually.
2. A volunteer with a positive history of TB will not be permitted to assist in the centers until they have provided written proof (from Physician/Health Dept.) to the Site Manager/Coordinator that they have no active disease process present in their lungs.
3. Parents who volunteer regularly or frequently at the center should provide proof of a TB skin test dated no later than 6 months prior to enrollment into the program.

               

Those volunteers identified needing a TB skin test will be provided this service free of charge.  The Health Assistant(s) assigned to their center will perform this test.    

*IN ORDER TO RECEIVE THE TB TEST, THE CLIENT SHOULD HAVE:

 

1. No current or past history of tuberculosis, exposure to disease, prophylactic medication or strongly positive skin test within 5 years (chest X-ray is required annually).
2.  No history of BCG immunization in the past 2 years.  (Monovac test should not be given if BCG has been received within the last 5 years.)
3. Should not be pregnant.

  

PROCEDURE

1. Centers should utilize volunteer information supplied by the database during the month of September (or first month after child’s entry into the program) to determine who is a frequent or regular volunteer.
2. Those individuals with more than 6 volunteer hours in the center within a 30 day period must receive a TB skin test.
3. The Site Manager should submit a list of those volunteers to the health specialist/assistants.
 

A.

Health Assistants and Nurse(s) will perform TB skin test Monday through Wednesday only (results to be read 48 hours after administration).
4. The Health Assistants will adhere to the Texas Department of Health guidelines for performing the TB skin test.
5. The Health Assistants will adhere to the Health Content Procedure for administering and referral service procedure for TB skin test.
  A. Information and consent form (HC-37)
  B. Referral form (EF-18)
6. The results of the TB skin test should be kept at the Site manager’s office in a file (notebook) labeled Parent/Volunteer TB Skin Test Results.  Volunteers will also receive a copy of the results of the TB skin test.
7. The Health Assistant should send the list of names (volunteers) and their results to the Health Content Area office.

 

REFERRAL PROCEDURE

 

1. The volunteer will receive an immunization record with the TB results.
2. A positive (>10mm) tuberculin skin test means a client has been exposed to tuberculosis.  A chest X-ray (paid for by individual) is required to determine whether the tuberculosis disease is present.  If tuberculosis is present, treatment must begin before individuals are permitted to volunteer in the centers.  However, they are allowed to drop off and pick up children from the center.
3. Volunteers must submit a doctor’s statement indicating no active disease per x-ray prior to volunteering in the centers.
4.  Services can be obtained from the Dallas County Health Department or a private physician.  Those volunteers with a positive skin test will be referred to Dallas County Health Department and a list will be given to the Site Manager.

 

 

PARENT EDUCATIONAL HANDBOOK

 

1. This booklet addresses some general educational information.
2. It should be discussed with the parent at enrollment by the Education Specialists or the Site Manager to ensure the parent understands the type of program we offer.
3. The parent can then ask any questions they might have about the program we offer.
4. The (booklet) Handbooks (and form) are provided in English, Spanish and Vietnamese.
5. Included in this discussion is HEAD START of Greater Dallas, Inc. "Discipline and Guidance Policies and Procedures".
6. After information is shared with parent an Acknowledgement Form must be signed by the parent.
7. The Parent Education Handbook is located in Head Start Share (hsshare) under education updated information can be copied.

 

Training for Parents

 

1. Each HEAD START center provides training for parents as a part of the monthly parent meeting.
2. The Education Content area participates in Parent Education activities each year.  All content areas take part in this effort.
3. Parents are also invited to attend other agency training throughout the year (Pre-Service, Spring Training and others).
4. GED classes are also available at specific HEAD START centers.
5.  ESL classes can be offered in each triad (depending on the need); transportation is available upon request from parents.